October 29, 2004

WHERE'S BOOM-BOOM MANCINI WHEN YOU NEED HIM? (via The Mother Judd):

With Nothing Left to Win, Fans of Red Sox Suddenly Feel a Loss (PAM BELLUCK, 10/29/04, NY times)

It didn't take long to go from ecstatic to existential.

Having waited 86 years for a World Series championship, Bostonians found themselves on Thursday swirling with elation, but also scratching their heads.

What are Red Sox fans to do when the angst of being one of the world's greatest underdogs is gone?


There is no dopeslap hard enough for such people.

Posted by Orrin Judd at October 29, 2004 11:09 AM
Comments

What a joke.

Thanks, I've received enough crap over the last 18 years about being a Red Sox fan--I mean people made fun of me in Rome and Hong Kong. I don't need any more agita. Think I'll be just fine cheering for a winning team, for a change.

Posted by: Brian (MN) at October 29, 2004 11:24 AM

Where's Boom-Boom Mancini when you need him?

Track #2 on Warren Zevon's Sentimental Hygeine.

Posted by: Mike Morley at October 29, 2004 11:47 AM

The NY Times continues to embellish its' reputation for sheer idiocy.

Posted by: M Ali Choudhury at October 29, 2004 11:47 AM

>> What are Red Sox fans to do when the angst of being one of the world's greatest underdogs is gone?

Become Cubs fans.

Posted by: kevin whited at October 29, 2004 11:52 AM

Become Cubs fans.

Death before dishonor, sir.

Posted by: Brian (MN) at October 29, 2004 11:59 AM

Of course, the New York Times is a financial investor in the Red Sox, so I suppose they could get all the partners together and have a fire sale a la the 1997 Florida Marlins and everyone will feel better a few years from now.

Of course, the dirtly little secret about pro sports today is that with each league having 30 or more teams, even if there was a perfect rotation between teams for the title, the average squad would only win a championship twice in the average person's lifetime. That may come closest to the truth in the NFL, where money and payrolls are the most evenly balanced, but in MLB and in the NBA, certain markets like New York or Los Angeles are going to dominate in the long run, since they either have more money to spend or more players want to go their for the possible outside endorsement deals/contracts.

So if the current number of teams stays the same, by the middle of this century you're going to start seeing a lot of pro squads whose fans have waited in vain 50 years or more for a championship.

Posted by: John at October 29, 2004 12:02 PM

What are Red Sox fans to do when the angst of being one of the world's greatest underdogs is gone?

Live with it. What else?

Posted by: Ken at October 29, 2004 4:37 PM

The Red Sox are one of about 6 teams that should be considered favorites year-in, year-out because of the size of their market. In the NFL, where parity of income is enforced, repeating as champion is nearly impossible because you can't hold onto your players, demonstrating the value of a great coach like Bellichek.

There is a certain constituency in Boston who revel in their suffering or make a living from it like Dan Shaughnessy, who will probably dive off the John Hancock Tower during the victory parade. But for the 99.9% of Boston fans who are within 2 standard deviations of sanity, this is a moment to savor and we can start again next spring rooting for a repeat, and confident that our team's management and players might very well oblige us.

Posted by: Bart at October 29, 2004 7:54 PM

I try really hard to understand other points of view, but I’m scratching my head with people like those below who are doubled up in angst. The Sox won, dummies. I don’t feel your angst. Painful was when the Red Sox lost to the Yankees, lost to the Mets in ’86, lost to the Reds in ’75, lost to the Cards in ’67.

To David Halberstam, I loved your two books about the Red Sox. But you're wrong here. “Some of the magic has (NOT) been snatched away.” The true magic is stronger than ever. Because the magic comes from believing you can do it once, and you can do it again.

True Red Sox fans don't wallow. True Red Sox fans are full of guilt. True Red Sox fans are not foolishly optimistic, but they're upbeat every year.

It's so like the NY Times to come up with such a pompous article like this.

Posted by: Jm Siegel at October 30, 2004 3:54 PM

I try hard to understand other points of view, but I cannot fathom the Red Sox fans in this NY Times article who are doubled up in angst after the World Series win. I don’t feel your pain, and neither do most of the Sox fans I know. When the Red Sox lost to the Yankees, lost to the Mets in ’86, lost to the Reds in ’75, lost to the Cards in ’67 -- now that's painful.

To David Halberstam, I loved your two books about the Red Sox. But you're wrong here. “Some of the magic has (NOT) been snatched away.” The true magic is stronger than ever. Because the magic comes from believing you can do it once, and you can do it again.

True Red Sox fans are not fools, but they're optimistic every season, every game. They don't wallow. They're not full of guilt.

It's so like the NY Times to come up with such a pompous article like this. We should expect a sequel -- "Patriots fans terrified that winning streak will end."

Posted by: Jim Siegel at October 30, 2004 4:02 PM
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