June 27, 2008

THAT'S NOT CRICKET:

New Zealand take controversial last-ball thriller (Jamie Alter at The Oval, June 25, 2008, CricInfo)

In easily the tightest contest of the summer, England were struggling to stay in the contest with New Zealand well placed on 173 for 4 in the 35th over, but hit back to dismiss Styris (brilliantly run out by Graeme Swann and Paul Collingwood), Oram (pulling to the deep) and Daniel Vettori (excellently held by Bopara at midwicket) in the space of 24 balls and for 16 runs - turning The Oval into a cauldron.

A fourth followed in the most controversial manner. With 26 needed from 39 balls, Mills called Grant Elliott for a sharp single. As Elliott bolted out of the blocks he collided with Sidebottom, rugby style, and fell flat to the ground. Ian Bell threw the ball to Kevin Pietersen, who broke the stumps, but England did not withdraw their appeal despite the umpire, Mark Benson, offering Collingwood the chance to think again. A peeved Elliott hobbled off for 24.

With 12 needed from 21, Bell knocked down the stumps with Tim Southee short of his crease. Mark Gillespie then survived a tantalizingly tense maiden 47th over from Swann, and no runs had been scored for nine deliveries when Mills, who had been sizing up the midwicket boundary, swatted Collingwood off the middle for a 106-metre six, to transform the equation from 12 from 10 to six from nine.

Manic singles followed, and it came down to three from six balls. Mills pinched a single, but the next five deliveries seemed to take an eternity as Luke Wright ploughed a channel outside off and Gillespie fished and missed repeatedly. Then, on the last ball, he pushed the ball to Swann at cover and set off for the single that would have secured the tie. Swann's shy, however, missed the stumps and with England's fielders all converging on the stumps, New Zealand's sprinted through for a delirious winning over-throw. England's final blemish in the field proved decisive.

Zemanta Pixie

Posted by Orrin Judd at June 27, 2008 3:46 PM

They're speaking English but I didn't understand a word. ; )

Posted by: Bartman at June 27, 2008 5:39 PM

England deserved to lose after insisting on appealing for a wicket in such a manner.

Posted by: John Thacker at June 27, 2008 5:58 PM

So does this mean that New Zealand does not have to pay the lagaan now?

Posted by: b at June 27, 2008 6:12 PM

Outstanding reference!

Posted by: oj at June 27, 2008 7:48 PM

With 12 needed from 21, Bell knocked down the stumps with Tim Southee short of his crease. Mark Gillespie then survived a tantalizingly tense maiden 47th over from Swann, and no runs had been scored for nine deliveries when Mills, who had been sizing up the midwicket boundary, swatted Collingwood off the middle for a 106-metre six, to transform the equation from 12 from 10 to six from nine.

I've read partnership tax regulations that made more sense.

Posted by: Mike Morley at June 27, 2008 9:56 PM

With 12 needed from 21

Several forms of cricket are played so that each team gets a certain number of deliveries to score runs. They must be strikes; balls (called wides or no-balls) don't count, and the batting team gets a free run. New Zealand was behind 11 runs (needing 12 to win) with 21 balls left.

Bell knocked down the stumps with Tim Southee short of his crease.

Essentially, Bell got Tim Southee by force out when he was not on base.

Mark Gillespie then survived a tantalizingly tense maiden 47th over from Swann

The pitches are separated into groups of 6 called "overs." A "maiden" is an over in which no runs are scored. Swann pitched a no-hitter to Gillespie in the 47th over.

and no runs had been scored for nine deliveries

The no-hitter continued for the next 3 pitches, where Collingwood pitching to Mills

when Mills, who had been sizing up the midwicket boundary

Mills was swinging for the fences in dead center

swatted Collingwood off the middle for a 106-metre six

hit a 350 foot home run off Collingwood

to transform the equation from 12 from 10 to six from nine.

To bring them within 6 runs of victory with nine pitches left.

Posted by: John Thacker at June 28, 2008 6:03 AM

I watched some cricket on a rainy day in England around 1992. I understood what was going on but the terminology sure seems to have changed. Thanks for the translation John.

Posted by: Bartman at June 28, 2008 8:03 AM
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