December 27, 2007

DISDAIN FOR THE BRIGHTS IS THE HEALTH OF THE STATE:

Revisiting the Stupid Party (Lee Harris, 27 Dec 2007, Tech Central Station)

The nineteenth century English philosopher John Stuart Mill bequeathed to modern conservatism a lasting inferiority complex when he dismissed the conservatives of his day as "the stupid party." No one likes to be called stupid, as we can all agree, though Mill himself may not have understood this, since it is highly unlikely that anyone had ever called him by this disparaging epithet. In his famous Autobiography, Mill tells us that he was reading Plato in the original Greek when he was five, and by the time he was twelve, he was capable of discussing the fine points of economic theory with the leading authorities of his day—facts that may well have seriously skewed Mill's judgment about the intelligence of other people. Stupid, for Mill, may have meant those who only learned how to read Plato in Greek at the ripe old age of eleven, in which case the charge of belonging to the "stupid party" loses much of its sting.

Yet the sting of Mill's insult remains today, and it explains, in part, the conspicuous braininess of contemporary conservatism. Conservative think-tanks abound in PhD's and experts in every field imaginable, whose intelligence, as measured by IQ tests and academic credentials, is certainly a match for those of their ideological opponents. But has the emergence of a conservative intelligentsia proven to be an unmixed blessing? Or is the very phrase conservative intelligentsia an oxymoron?

Let's begin by noting that the eagerness to appear intelligent to others is a fairly recent development among conservatives. By and large, the English Tories whom Mill dubbed as the original stupid party did not share this desire in the least. If you read the delightful novels of Anthony Trollope, you will find them teaming with hilariously dim-witted Lords who feel no need to apologize for their mediocre minds, as long as they have their aristocratic pedigrees. Their stupidity, as many of them no doubt hazily realized, was their best defense against the inroads of clever madmen intent on turning their world upside down—men like John Stuart Mill, for example, to whom tradition meant nothing, and who was willing to throw out the solid heritage of the past in the pursuit of the latest fad, dubbed by him "experiments in living." Against the blueprints for a better world concocted by the brilliant they opposed the redneck wisdom encapsulated in the adage: "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

Today, no self-respecting conservative wants to be thought stupid, not even by the lunatics on the far left. Yet there are far worse things than looking stupid to others—and one of them is being conned by those who are far cleverer than we are.


Nothing becomes Americans, in general, nor conservatives, in particular (but I repeat myself), nor explains our avoidance of the -isms, than our anti-Intellectualism

Posted by Orrin Judd at December 27, 2007 4:49 PM
Comments

To be a Conservative you only have to read, & understand, Himmelfarb's "The Roads to Modernity" explaining the Anglo/American Enlightenment and everything by de Tocqueville, explaining the results of said Enlightenment.
Lots and lots of other good books for Conservatives, http://www.brothersjudd.com/,but these should be the 1st reads.

Posted by: Mike at December 27, 2007 9:49 PM
« POD PEOPLE: | Main | NOT THAT ANYONE EVER HAD A PLAUSIBLE THEORY OF HOW HE COULD LOSE: »