March 10, 2007

WHO KNEW THERE WAS A GOOD SENSE?:

A French intellectual--in the worst sense of the term: Jean Baudrillard could make any subject more obscure just by briefly visiting it (Robert Fulford, 3/10/07, National Post)

Jean Baudrillard, who died on Tuesday in Paris at the age of 77, was a French intellectual in the most sinister meaning of that term.

He was intoxicated by hastily concocted theories and drunk on incomprehensible explanations of world affairs. He could make any subject more obscure just by briefly visiting it. Many of his readers eventually discovered that his work, some 50 books in all, usually wasn't about what it claimed to be about. His real concern was always Baudrillard and the passionate drama of his daydreams.

His way of thinking involved intense snobbery on his part and great tolerance on the reader's. To the public and his students he said, in effect: "You poor fools are deluded by all your ideals, your dreams, your accomplishments. You think that's reality? It's a fraud, all of it. I know better."

Strange as it seems, in the 1970s much of the Western world was ready to embrace him.


Is there anything about the 1970s that doesn't seem strange after Solzhenitsyn, Thatcher and Reagan straightened us out?

Posted by Orrin Judd at March 10, 2007 5:46 PM
Comments

Who is there that might replace them? I like W, I've supported W, I voted for W during a primary where he was certain to win. W is no Reagan or Thatcher.

Who else is out there?
I like Gingrich and Bolton. Neither of them has a chance.

The only hope I hold out now is 1. that Blair is a leftist and 2. Howard of Australia seems to see things quite clearly.

Perhaps they represent some type of delayed action.
:(

Posted by: 628318-23 at March 10, 2007 6:10 PM
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