June 9, 2006

MEANWHILE, IN AMERICA (via Mike Daley):

Albion's Seed (David Hackett Fischer)

During the first two centuries of American history, ball games were not common in the Southern colonies. What is now the American national game was originally a New England folk sport. It still preserves a combination of order and action, reason and emotion, individuality and collective effort which was characteristic of Puritan culture.


Posted by Orrin Judd at June 9, 2006 9:23 AM
Comments

Speaking of Albion's sons, here's a little something you'll hear sung by the England fans during their matches:

"I said to my mate the other day,
I think I've found the White Pele.
He said to me 'Who is he?'
I said he goes by the name ROONEY.
The White Pele, the white Pele, Wayne Rooney is the White Pele. White Pele, white Pele, Wayne Rooney is the white Pele."
(Sung To The Tune "Tom Hark")

Posted by: Jim in Chicago at June 9, 2006 9:38 AM

Nice race obsession.

Posted by: oj at June 9, 2006 9:42 AM

What is now the American national game was originally a New England folk sport. It still preserves a combination of order and action, reason and emotion, individuality and collective effort which was characteristic of Puritan culture.

"The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It has been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game: it's a part of our past, Ray. It reminds of us of all that once was good and it could be again."

--Terrence Mann

Posted by: Mike Morley at June 9, 2006 9:54 AM

America's national sport used to be baseball, now it's football. In the future, it'll be car racing.

Posted by: Brandon at June 9, 2006 10:05 AM

Brandon, NASCAR is already the number one spectator sport in America. Although I just don't get the attraction. I've never been a fan of the "round-and-rounds."

Posted by: Bartman at June 9, 2006 10:26 AM

The folks who look at NASCAR and see a "round-and-round" are missing the part that the fans love. From a big-picture perspective, it might not make a lot of sense. That's why you've got to pick 1 or 2 good drivers to really root for (or choose a manufacturer and root for the "teams" that run that manufacturer's car). Then you enjoy the battles for position and the work of the pit crew to get the car in and out in uner 15-16 seconds. It's about the details, I guess. At least that's my take on it. If you just look at it as a bunch of cars going round you miss the fun.

p.s. It also helps to choose a couple drivers that you really DONT want to win and root against them.

Posted by: Jay at June 9, 2006 11:25 AM

It's baseball. Football is gender specific and NASCAR regional.

Posted by: oj at June 9, 2006 12:04 PM

Football may not be as gender specific as you think. We have women in our fantasy league and there seems to be almost as many enthusiastic female Seahawks fans as there are male. Then again, this isn't Peoria, so making nationwide generalities from Seattle realities might be a mistake.

Posted by: Patrick H at June 9, 2006 12:15 PM

Those are just men in skirts.

Posted by: oj at June 9, 2006 12:19 PM

NASCAR is becoming less regional. It even comes to N.H. Jay's comment is good. The continuing "soap opera" aspect of the series also draws a lot of interest, methinks.

Posted by: jdkelly at June 9, 2006 2:27 PM

Baseball is as gender-specific as football.

Posted by: Brandon at June 9, 2006 2:34 PM

No, it isn't.

Posted by: oj at June 9, 2006 4:13 PM
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