April 11, 2006

POLER OPPOSITE:

Modern Mind-Set Pays In Out-of-Date Market (Molly Moore, April 11, 2006, Washington Post)

As teenagers in a middle-class suburb of Paris, Pierre Kosciusko-Morizet and Nicolas Dhelft shared the same circle of friends, attended the same parties and watched the same movies.

Today, seven years out of business school, Kosciusko-Morizet, 28, is president of one of the fastest-growing online sales companies in France. At a time when youth unemployment here is more than 22 percent, the young French executive, who started his career at a bank in Richmond, has added 50 workers to his payroll in the past six months -- most of them English-speaking engineers and technicians.

In contrast, Dhelft, 29, has worked only eight months since graduating from a liberal arts college with the dream of becoming a research director. He has received government welfare or unemployment benefits for most of the past four years, something he feels "a little bit" guilty about but believes the government owes him.

The story of the two friends who came of age on opposite sides of the French economy illustrates a generation torn between a need to embrace the globalized world of the 21st century and the fear of relinquishing the government security blankets of the 20th.


Such visible social Darwinism led to the belief in biological Darwinism.

Posted by Orrin Judd at April 11, 2006 7:05 AM
Comments

Mirabile dictu! Clear thinking about "social 'Darwinism'," versus "Darwinism."

There is hope yet. Now just start dropping quotes like, "Pervading all nature there may be seen at work a kind of stern discipline which is a little cruel that it may be very kind."

Posted by: Lou Gots at April 11, 2006 12:18 PM
« A CENTRAL BANK THAT'S CLOSER TO THE MARK: | Main | AMERICANS FOR AMNESTY: »