February 19, 2006

THERE IS NO SKATELESS JOE:

In Search of the Great American Hockey Novel (KEITH GESSEN, 2/19/06, NY Times Book Review)

What accounts for the marginal place of hockey in the world of American professional sports? Might it not, in the end, have something to do with its marginal place in the world of American letters? While the literatures of boxing and baseball are vast, and basketball (John McPhee's "Sense of Where You Are") and football (Don DeLillo's "End Zone," H. G. Bissinger's "Friday Night Lights") also have their classic texts, hockey remains comparatively undocumented. Will historians of the future even know that at the beginning of the 21st century, rugged men from many nations gathered in artificially chilled arenas in Buffalo, Ottawa, St. Paul and Philadelphia to contest Lord Stanley's Cup? To paraphrase Saul Bellow: Where is the Chekhov of the Chicago Blackhawks? Who is the Stendhal of the stick to the groin?

There are just two great hockey books and neither is a novel:


Posted by Orrin Judd at February 19, 2006 12:00 AM
Comments

Yes but there is great hockey movie: Slap Shot.

Posted by: Robert Schwartz at February 19, 2006 12:54 PM

And, let's not forget, a classic song.

Actually, for anyone with young ones into the game, there is a dynamite kid series.

Posted by: Peter B at February 19, 2006 2:53 PM

"Tropic of Hockey" by Dave Bidini. Not great literature, but an entertaining look at all the unlikely places people play hockey. Like Saudi Arabia, for example.

Posted by: ted welter at February 19, 2006 2:59 PM

Two great movies. You forgot Miracle.

Posted by: Mike Morley at February 19, 2006 4:43 PM

Three great movies. You forgot 'The Mighty Ducks'.


... OK, so maybe just two great movies.

Posted by: BrianOfAtlanta at February 22, 2006 11:51 AM
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