January 16, 2006

WITH THIS NANORING I THEE SPED:

Memory Design Breakthrough Can Lead To Faster Computers (SPX Jan 16, 2006)

Imagine a computer that doesn't lose data even in a sudden power outage, or a coin-sized hard drive that could store 100 or more movies. Magnetic random-access memory, or MRAM, could make these possible, and would also offer numerous other advantages. It would, for instance, operate at much faster than the speed of ordinary memory but consume 99 percent less energy.

The current challenge, however, is the design of a fast, reliable and inexpensive way to build stable and densely packed magnetic memory cells.

A team of researchers at The Johns Hopkins University, writing in the Jan. 13 issue of Physical Review Letters, has come up with one possible answer: tiny, irregularly shaped cobalt or nickel rings that can serve as memory cells. These "nanorings" can store a great quantity of information. They also are immune to the problem of "stray" magnetic fields, which are fields that "leak" from other kinds of magnets and can thus interfere with magnets next to them.

"It's the asymmetrical design that's the breakthrough, but we are also very excited about the fast, efficient and inexpensive method we came up with for making them," said paper co-author Frank Q. Zhu, a doctoral candidate in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences at Johns Hopkins.

Posted by Orrin Judd at January 16, 2006 12:00 AM
Comments

Turing and Church, we're going back to core memory!

Posted by: Annoying Old Guy at January 16, 2006 11:05 AM

Polemos pater panton, as we move toward 7.62 mm precision guided munitions.

Posted by: Lou Gots at January 16, 2006 11:15 AM

AOG, ya beat me to it.

Posted by: joe shropshire at January 16, 2006 11:26 AM

core memory was great. machines would just start running right from where you left off, when the power was re-applied.

Posted by: toe at January 16, 2006 2:05 PM

Now I know why Frodo had to toss the ring into the molten lava.

Posted by: Steve White at January 16, 2006 2:48 PM

They had one at the university of Michigan in the early 70s. One and half megabytes was the size of a refigerator and the whole thing cost $14,000,000 when gas was $0.35/gal.

Posted by: Robert Schwartz at January 17, 2006 2:37 AM
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