October 28, 2005

GROWTH STRAINS (via Mike Daley):

Christian Republicans (Patrick Hynes, 10/28/2005, American Spectator)

[T]he Republican Party isn't identified with one particular sectarian position. It's just that the Republican Party is a conservative party and the conservative strains of most Christian sects (which also happen to be the growing strains) have abandoned minor sectarian differences and coalesced around shared positions on key cultural issues. The GOP benefited from a majority of Catholic and Protestant votes in 2004, for example.

Danforth believes its relationship with the Religious Right will be bad for the Republican Party in the long run. It's hard to imagine how that can be. Indeed, it's hard to imagine a Republican Party at all without the Religious Right.

Almost 28 million Evangelical Christians voted in 2004. These folks split their votes in favor of President George W. Bush over Sen. John Kerry by a margin of 78% to 22%. That amounts to over 21 million voters. Throw in 6.9 million observant Catholics and nearly 1 million conservative and orthodox Jews and we end up with over 29 million religiously motivated voters that support the Republican Party.

Compare that number to MoveOn.org's 2.5 million Democrats. Or Big Labor's 16.7 million. Or the 11.8 million blacks who routinely vote straight Democrat.

Let's look at it another way. If the United States had a European-style parliamentary government, the Religious Right would be the "natural party of government," perennially winning a plurality of seats and serving as a mainstay in successive coalition governments. The Religious Right is the largest single voting block in American politics and whether John Danforth likes it or not, it is a predominantly Republican voting block. Consider: Being born-again is a greater predictor of a Republican vote than owning a gun, being white, being a man, or being a millionaire.


Orthodox Jews likewise vote disproportionately Republican. You can't take the moral teachings of any monotheism seriously and then vote Democrat.

Posted by Orrin Judd at October 28, 2005 9:50 PM
Comments

"Let's look at it another way. If the United States had a European-style parliamentary government, the Religious Right would be the "natural party of government," perennially winning a plurality of seats and serving as a mainstay in successive coalition governments. "

Well, that might why I haven't heard much lately by Leftists on their great plans to "reform" the Congress or voting to make it look more Canadian or European or "proportional". It would be another example of the Law of Unintended Consequences in action, so maybe they've finally learned that all their great "reforms" never work out as they hope. (In this case, keep themselves in power.)

Posted by: Raoul Ortega at October 29, 2005 1:29 PM

Did anyone happen to catch that NBC News or Dateline thing on Evangelical Christiaans that was on Friday night? Brokaw did it and NBC presented evangelicals as if they were some sort of rare giant squid that has never really been seen and very little is know about them.

Posted by: pchuck at October 29, 2005 2:45 PM
« MY PARTY WENT TO WAR OVER VALERIE PLAME AND ALL I GOT WAS A SCOOTER: | Main | THERE ARE TEN BIASES (via David Hill, The Bronx): »