September 14, 2005

KEEP THE PORT, MOVE THE PEOPLE:

Port Comes Back Early, Surprisingly: Shipping Resumes On a Small Scale (Keith L. Alexander and Neil Irwin, September 14, 2005, Washington Post

The Port of New Orleans began unloading its first cargo ship since Hurricane Katrina on Tuesday night, months sooner than was predicted, a sign that disruption to the nation's shipping capacity may be less severe than originally forecast.

After the storm, port officials figured it would take six months to resume service in New Orleans and at facilities throughout the Gulf Coast. Importers scurried to reroute coffee, steel and other commodities, and Midwest farmers worried that they wouldn't be able to ship their grain to the rest of the world during the harvest. The disruption threatened the supply of goods across the United States, and some forecasters said it would cause a drag on the economy.

But Tuesday, the port was coming back to life, with electrical power restored to parts of the facility by late afternoon. About 8:30 p.m., the Lykes Flyer container ship pulled into the port, and towering cranes began lifting boxcar-size containers of plywood and coffee beans from the ship, as if they were children's building blocks. The goods were to be placed on trucks that would carry them out along newly cleared roads, for distribution across the nation.

Gary P. LaGrange, chief executive of the port, said he expects it to be at 80 percent of capacity within three months. The Port of South Louisiana and Port Fourchon, on the Gulf Coast, have also partially restored service, and the Port of Pascagoula, Miss., expects to resume service by early October, according to the American Association of Port Authorities.

That has made economists more optimistic about the hurricane's impact on the nation.


Couldn't they have waited until after the Fed meets next?

Posted by Orrin Judd at September 14, 2005 8:09 AM
Comments

Is this a great country or what! Our guys are capable of anything as long the guvmint leaves us alone.

Posted by: erp at September 14, 2005 8:25 AM

It's all Bush's fault.

Posted by: AWW at September 14, 2005 10:01 AM

It's a shock and an outrage that it took the Chimperor this long to open the port! FEMA dropped the ball. Any competent government would've reopened it 5 minutes after the hurricane made landfall! What if this was a terrorist attack! Aren't you sheeple embarassed that you voted for this incompetent yet?!? The only reason it's evenreopened now is b/c Mother Sheehan and Moveon went in and did the business.

/Perlstein

Posted by: Jim in Chicago at September 14, 2005 10:48 AM

JIm, the Bushitler isn't incompetent, he's adequate. The perfesser said so.

Posted by: erp at September 14, 2005 12:59 PM

I think that this suggests a better proposal than the one floated about turning NOLA into a post-bellum Dixieland theme park, a la Colonial Williamsburg.

The French Quarter managed mostly to withstand Katrina's worst. So let the quarter go back to being its old, seedy self. If the port is already coming back and the offshore rigs follow suit, a lot guys on their time off will want a place to have a few beers and good chow, listen to music, and flirt with the working girls. Some tourists will also go for that ambience. Turn the rest of NOLA into a big, grazzy park park.

Better down-at-the-heels and genuine than all refurbished and phoney. It's a low-cost win-win.

Posted by: Ed Bush at September 14, 2005 6:21 PM

I think that this suggests a better proposal than the one floated about turning NOLA into a post-bellum Dixieland theme park, a la Colonial Williamsburg.

The French Quarter managed mostly to withstand Katrina's worst. So let the quarter go back to being its old, seedy self. If the port is already coming back and the offshore rigs follow suit, a lot guys on their time off will want a place to have a few beers and good chow, listen to music, and flirt with the working girls. Some tourists will also go for that ambience. Turn the rest of NOLA into a big, grazzy park park.

Better down-at-the-heels and genuine than all refurbished and phoney. It's a low-cost win-win.

Posted by: Ed Bush at September 14, 2005 6:31 PM

Ed:

It'd be both.

Posted by: oj at September 14, 2005 7:42 PM

Just do a ban on new residential housing below sea level. If the port location is that important and businesses then see enough of a reward for building in those areas to outweigh the risk factor of a future storm, they're the ones putting up the money, not the feds, with subsidized disaster relief loans to place homes back into the best-known flood plain in America.

Posted by: John at September 14, 2005 8:06 PM
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