July 12, 2019

ONLY MICHELLE TICKS ALL THREE BOXES:

A Midsummer Overview Of The Democratic Field (Nate Silver, 7/11/19, 538)

Tier 1: The front-runners: Biden, Harris and Warren

Biden, Harris and Warren represent three relatively distinct, but fairly traditional, archetypes for party nominees:

Biden, as a former vice president, is a "next-in-line" candidate who is rather explicitly promising to perpetuate the legacy of President Obama and uphold the party's current agenda. It might not be exciting, but these candidates have pretty good track records.

Harris is a coalition-builder who would hope to unite the different factions of the party -- black, white, left, liberal, moderate, etc. -- as a consensus choice.

Warren is offering more red meat (or should it be blue meat?) and would represent more of a leftward transformation from the status quo. But she's simpatico enough with party elites and has broad enough appeal that she isn't necessarily a factional candidate in the way that Sanders is. Instead, a better analogy for Warren might be Ronald Reagan; they are not comparable in terms of their backgrounds or their political styles, but they are both candidates who straddle the boundary between the ideological wings of their party and the party establishment.

On an empirical basis, the Biden and Harris strategies have produced more winners than the Warren one, although all three approaches are viable. That doesn't mean that Biden, Harris and Warren are the only candidates pursuing these strategies. Cory Booker's coalition could look a lot like Harris's, for instance, were he ever to gain traction. But they're the only candidates who are both (a) taking approaches that have worked well in the past and (b) polling reasonably well at the moment. That puts them in the top tier.

How you would rank them within the top tier is harder. But we should probably start with the fact that Biden is still ahead of the other two in the polls. It's closer in early state polls, and it's closer once you account for the fact that Harris and Warren still aren't as well-known as Biden is. But Biden's lead is nontrivial -- he's ahead of Harris by 12 percentage points (and Warren by 13) in the RealClearPolitics average.

And while you might claim that Harris and Warren have momentum, you need to be careful with that. Often, polling bounces from debates and other events fade, so it's at least possible that Harris and Warren are at their high-water marks. Or not. But Biden is (POKER ANALOGY ALERT!) a bit like a poker player who's just lost a big pot. Before, he had way more chips than Warren and Harris did; now, he has only slightly more than they do. But you'd still rather be the candidate with more chips than fewer, momentum be damned.

Unless ... the way you lost that hand reveals something about your game that could come back to bite you again in the future. Biden wasn't very effective in the debates, according to the voters we surveyed along with Morning Consult. And some of his decline in the polls has to do with what could be Biden's two biggest vulnerabilities: his electability halo bursting and voters expressing concern about his age. The age problem isn't going away. And while Biden can still make an electability case -- there are plenty of polls showing him doing better than other Democrats against President Trump -- voters are at least likely to scrutinize his argument rather than take it for granted.

Only Biden and Kamala appeal to two of the three core constituencies required: the folks who just want reassurance; black women and Progressives.  

Posted by at July 12, 2019 2:28 PM

  

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