May 3, 2019

ONLY NIKKI ESCAPED INTACT:

Trump, Wrecker of Reputations: On Attorney General William Barr's testimony and the coming constitutional crisis. (Susan B. GlasserMay 2, 2019, The New Yorker)

In his short time in politics, President Trump has shred the careers, professional integrity, and dignity of many who have worked for him. Attorney General William Barr is no exception.Photograph by Evan Vucci / AP

In the first year of the Trump Presidency, White House advisers often promised reporters that this would be the week when they would unveil Trump's plans for a massive investment in American infrastructure. On the campaign trail, Donald Trump had vowed to spend a trillion dollars rebuilding roads, bridges, and airports. He said that he would work with Democrats to do it. For a time, it seemed to be the only bipartisan project that might actually go somewhere. But, of course, Infrastructure Week never happened. There was always some distraction, some P.R. disaster that overwhelmed it--a chief of staff to be fired, an errant tweet upending foreign policy. Infrastructure Week lived on as an Internet meme, a Twitter hashtag, a joke; it became shorthand for the Administration's inability to stay on message or organize itself to promote a legislative agenda it claimed to support.

Trump never fully gave up on the infrastructure idea, though, and this week he resurrected it in a rare meeting with congressional Democratic leaders, who emerged from the White House on Tuesday morning, smiling and apparently excited. The President, they explained, had decided to double the price tag of his proposal, from a trillion to two trillion dollars, because it sounded more impressive. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, to whom the President reportedly offered Tic Tacs at the meeting in a friendly gesture, praised his vision for a "big and bold" plan. The meeting, Senator Chuck Schumer added, had been a "very, very good start."

But it was all just a form of Washington performance art. There are no Republican votes for such an expensive package, as the Democrats well knew, and there is no way that the President's allies on Capitol Hill, nor his own penny-pinching White House chief of staff, would agree to such a budget-busting deal. Trump's "extreme and aspirational" idea, as Senator Kevin Cramer, of North Dakota, put it, had Republicans "rolling their eyes," Politico reported. The ranking member of the House committee that would have to approve any measure had offered a simple answer to the question of whether Trump's idea could ever be passed. "No," he said. It would not be Infrastructure Week, or even Infrastructure Day. The new era of bipartisan dealmaking was over before it began.

By late Tuesday, the news cycle had moved on. Trump's Attorney General, William Barr, was refusing to testify before the Democratic-controlled House Judiciary Committee and would not turn over the unredacted Mueller report or its underlying evidence. The Administration, in fact, was refusing to comply with more or less any congressional demands for information and testimony on an array of investigations of the President, from his business-related conflicts of interest to his family-separation policy at the border. Then came more news: Barr had a behind-the-scenes dispute with the special counsel about his characterization of the report. Robert Mueller, it turned out, had sent a letter to Barr (who later called the missive "snitty") weeks earlier, but it was only now being revealed. In the letter, Mueller suggested that Barr had minimized and deflected the serious questions about the President that Mueller's investigation had turned up. The next day, the whole mess was fought over in excruciating detail when Barr appeared before the Republican-controlled Senate Judiciary Committee to testify for the first time since the release of the Mueller report.

By Thursday, House Democrats were holding a hearing, with an empty chair where Barr would have been seated, had he shown up, and threatening to take the Attorney General to court. One of the Democrats had brought fried chicken, which some of his fellow-representatives ate during the hearing, to mock Barr--he's a chicken, get it? It was all a "stunt," a "circus," and a "travesty," Representative Doug Collins, the panel's top Republican, complained. But Representative Jerry Nadler, the Judiciary Committee's Democratic chairman, said that nothing less than the "integrity of this chamber," the Constitution, and the American system of "not having a President as a dictator" was at stake in Barr's refusal to comply with the Judiciary Committee's subpoena. "There is no way forward for this country that does not include a reckoning with this clear and present danger to our constitutional order," Nadler added. Soon after, Pelosi, at a press conference, told reporters that the Administration's refusal to coƶperate with Congress on so many matters was itself obstruction. As for Barr, she said, he had lied under oath to Congress about his dealings with Mueller and "disgraced" his office. "We are in a very, very, very challenging place," she said. So much for Infrastructure Week. The constitutional crisis was back on.

The Trump Presidency has been a great wrecker of reputations. In his short time in politics, Trump has managed to shred the careers, professional integrity, and dignity of many of those who worked for him.

His Beltway and Commentariat backers come off even worse; they aren't being paid.  Better a hooker...

Posted by at May 3, 2019 8:21 AM

  

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