November 6, 2018

NOT THAT EVERY DAY ISN'T A GREAT DAY TO BE AN AMERICAN...:>

...but Election Day is always particularly enjoyable.
Like, one suspects, numerous Republicans, I voted straight GOP at state level but Democrat for Congress.

NH is likely to re-elect our GOP governor but send two Democrats to Congress, a level of ticket-splitting which is fairly unusual here. (Heard a great line about the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Molly Kelly: Two first names but no agenda.)

That reflects the fact that we are in a conservative epoch and most Americans are quite satisfied with their incumbent Republican governors, but that the president is profoundly unpopular and we want someone to ride herd on him, a duty which congressional Republicans completely abdicated. Open gubernatorial seats look likely to swing Democratic due to the Donald headwind.

The GOP is extremely fortunate that the Senate map was so favorable this year, making it almost impossible to lose the majority.  

Meanwhile, the stasis of a divided government could give us all a nice pause until 2020 when we get a do-over at the national level and put the awful Baby Boomer generation behind us, once and for all.



MORE:
Our right to vote (John R. Allen, 11/02/18, The Brookings Institution

For much of my adult life, I served my country abroad in places where democracy was either a long-ago memory or distant idea.  These were regions that had known generations of cruel dictatorships and corrupt governance structures, where the notion of free political thought was utterly foreign and often deemed unthinkable or dangerous to those who gripped power so tightly.  And in those places, where nascent democracies were struggling to take root, I was frequently reminded of the precious gift Americans have been given: a democracy, with the freedom for every citizen to vote in peaceful elections as part of our democratic process.

Our foundational right to vote is central to our need to continually work to protect, preserve, and strengthen our democracy.  This is something for which I have fought nearly my entire life to uphold. We, as Americans, have paid a significant price for our freedom and our form of government, but we should regularly remind ourselves that democracy is by no means inevitable. Yet today our right to vote, and our belief in the inevitability of our democratic system, are too often taken for granted.

The United States is grounded upon the idea that individuals are owed the equal opportunity to voice their opinion as we, through our elected officials, chart the course of our nation.  This idea is foundational to our American values and informs a great deal about what it means to be a citizen of the United States.  And while we have important work to do to remove barriers to voting, improve voter access and enforce the rights of all voters to make their voices heard and their votes to count, we cannot allow these challenges to derail our urgency to vote in the first place.



Posted by at November 6, 2018 7:48 AM

  

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