September 29, 2018

AND PAY FOR THEIR EDUCATIONS:

Why America Faces a Doctor Shortage: Outdated accreditation standards have not kept pace with a changing world and the spiraling costs of medical education. (Tim Rice, September 26, 2018, City Journal)

For more than 75 years, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education (LCME), a joint venture of the American Medical Association (AMA) and the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), has been tasked with maintaining excellence in American medical education by accrediting all medical schools in the U.S. and Canada. At first glance, LCME seems like a necessary and useful organization. But is it?

Its effect on the training of U.S. doctors is counterproductive. The cost in time and money of becoming a doctor in America is now so prohibitive that it's constraining the supply--the U.S. is facing a projected shortfall of between 42,600 and 121,300 physicians by 2030. My colleague Chris Pope and I have suggested that this problem could be solved if American students could begin studying medicine immediately after high school and complete their studies in six or seven years, not eight, which is the U.S. norm. Countries where medical students can follow this path wind up with more physicians per capita, lower rates of physician pay, and comparable medical quality with that in the U.S.

Posted by at September 29, 2018 4:55 PM

  

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