September 22, 2018

ALL IN YOUR HEAD:

A Skeptical Consumer's Look at Chiropractic Claims: Flimflam in Florida? (Bruce Thyer and Gary Whittenberger, January / February 2008, Skeptical Inquirer)

The late Carl Sagan said "Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence." This skeptical principle can be applied generally to the area of consumer affairs and more specifically to the claims of chiropractic, an "alternative healing" approach now practiced widely throughout the United States and other parts of the world.

Chiropractic practice began in 1895, when D.D. Palmer administered a 'chiropractic adjustment' to a deaf man who reportedly regained his hearing. Palmer, a grocer and 'magnetic healer,' made great claims about the importance of his new treatment for human ailments. According to Palmer, "A subluxated vertebrae . . . is the cause of 95 percent of all diseases . . . the other 5 percent is caused by displaced joints other than those of the vertebral column."

The very existence of vertebral subluxations and their etiological role in health problems is uncertain and subject to considerable controversy, since there is very little empirical evidence in support of the efficacy of chiropractic (see Crelin 1973; Keating, Charlton, Grod, Perle, Sikorski, and Winterstein 2005).

Posted by at September 22, 2018 7:53 AM

  

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