August 11, 2018

THE TRUMPBOTS ARE AN OLD CANCER...:

When the Tide Comes In (JONAH GOLDBERG, August 11, 2018, National Review)

In January of 1959, The Mercury had run an editorial "revealing" a Jewish conspiracy of world conquest along the lines of The Protocols of the Elders of Zion.

Buckley was under pressure from backers of NR and others to publicly rebuke and denounce The Mercury. But some on the NR board worried that it would cost the fledgling magazine many of its subscribers. One board member, Mrs. A. E. Bonbrake, whom Judis describes as "a Forest Hills housewife whom Buckley had promoted to the board as a representative grass-roots activist," asked, "Since when is it the job of National Review to attack supposedly anti-Semitic publications?"

(More about that "supposedly" later.)

"But Buckley felt hypocritical at remaining silent," Judis recounts. "He wrote Bonbrake, "I do not feel comfortable criticizing Liberals . . . for not disavowing objectionable Liberals, when I do not myself [disavow objectionable conservatives]."

Buckley first settled for a compromise: National Review's editors would not write for The Mercury nor would National Review publish anyone associated with it. If you were on their masthead, you couldn't be on ours. Remember, The Mercury had long been a respected publication on the right, and many of the writers at National Review had cut their teeth writing for it. Many were on both mastheads, in one capacity or another. No longer. You can be with us or with them, but not both. All but one writer sided with National Review.

James Burnham and Whittaker Chambers enthusiastically agreed with Buckley. Chambers welcomed the memo as a "liberation." "How good, and how strong, it is to take a principled position," Chambers wrote to Buckley. "It defines, and defining, frees. Now what is good and strong outside us can draw to us, about whom there is, in this connection, no longer question, equivocation. The dregs will be drawn to the dregs, and sink where they belong."

A few subscriptions were cancelled, but not many. Quickly, other leading conservatives followed NR's example and repudiated The Mercury.

Maguire was furious that Buckley had broken the popular-front orthodoxy of the Right. Maguire soon shriveled up to a footnote in obscure books; Buckley went the other direction, to understate it dramatically.

Now, I am not trying to whitewash National Review's history. NR would go on to make some morally grievous editorial errors, particularly on civil rights. It would also rally to the defense of cranks, anti-Semites, and demagogues on too many occasions, albeit on free-speech grounds or in the name of the noble cause of anti-Communism.

And with the advantage of hindsight, one can argue that NR dawdled in excommunicating other elements of the irresponsible Right. That is always an issue with conservatives, who, by nature and design, prefer to measure at least twice before cutting even once. ("I must bear with infirmities until they fester into crimes," as Edmund Burke said.)

...but when they metastasize they need to be cut.



Posted by at August 11, 2018 5:58 PM

  

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