June 4, 2018

THE rIGHT IS THE lEFT:

Galston on the New "Revolt of the Masses" (AURELIAN CRAIUTU, 6/04/18, Law & Liberty)

In Galston's view, populism is always accompanied by a distinctive set of well-defined policies and a certain art of governance with a clear inner logic.[2] It cuts across the Left and the Right, and is semantically eclectic. Rightwing populists tend to attack immigrants and scapegoat minorities, foreign countries, or independent NGOs, while leftwing populists attack the banking system, large corporations, and, more recently, denounce police or state brutality. Either way, populism appears as a form of politics "that reflects distinctive theoretical commitments and generates its own political practice," writes Galston. It is based on a "dyadic" and Manichaean vision that divides society into two opposing forces and pits an allegedly homogenous and virtuous "people" against a corrupt and ill-intentioned elite, identified with the establishment.

Populist leaders uniformly claim that only they represent the "true" voice and will of the "real" people or the "silent majority," and stigmatize all other politicians as illegitimate or corrupt. Moreover, populists view themselves as arch-democrats who challenge establishment values and elites. They believe that ordinary citizens are better suited than experts or politicians to make key decisions about most aspects of their lives. [...]

He designates anti-pluralism as the most important aspect of populism. Anti-pluralism is divisive and inhibits compromise among the many groups that contend for power in society. By endorsing an idiosyncratic view of virtual representation, populists slowly undermine the general confidence in democratic norms, procedures, rules, and institutions. They adopt--and encourage their supporters to adopt--conspiracy theories and constantly look for scapegoats on which to blame all of the problems their countries face. Genuine debate based on solid evidence and reasoned argument is gradually replaced by alternative facts and loud denunciation of one's opponents.

Relying on a nice quote from Lincoln--"The dogmas of the quiet past are inadequate to the stormy present. ... As our case is new, so we must think anew, and act anew"-- Galston urges a  new way of thinking as we try to grasp the roots and the nature of our present discontent. He is concerned that the concept of populism has become a dangerous weapon, especially if one takes into account how it seeks to undermine key liberal principles. The fact that populism seems to be more an emotion-laden stance than an ideology only contributes to its heightened appeal in times of crisis. 




Posted by at June 4, 2018 4:43 AM

  

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