April 30, 2018

IF ONLY IT WERE THE END:

The End of Intelligence (Michael V. Hayden, April 28, 2018, NY Times)

It was no accident that the Oxford Dictionaries' word of the year in 2016 was "post-truth," a condition where facts are less influential in shaping opinion than emotion and personal belief. To adopt post-truth thinking is to depart from Enlightenment ideas, dominant in the West since the 17th century, that value experience and expertise, the centrality of fact, humility in the face of complexity, the need for study and a respect for ideas.

President Trump both reflects and exploits this kind of thinking. It is fair to say that the Trump campaign normalized lying to an unprecedented degree. There was the candidate's claim that legions of Arabs celebrated wildly in New Jersey as the World Trade Center collapsed. He defended his calls for the intentional killing of the Sept. 11 terrorists' families because "they knew what was happening" and had "watched their husband on television flying into the World Trade Center," something for which there is zero evidence. He insinuated that Senator Ted Cruz's father had a hand in John F. Kennedy's assassination and that the Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia had been murdered.

When pressed on specifics, the president has routinely denigrated those who questioned him, whether the "fake" media, "so called" judges, Washington insiders or the "deep state." He has also condemned Obama-era intelligence officials as "political hacks."

David Priess, an intelligence officer who once gave presidential daily briefings, asked me whether I thought Mr. Trump could distinguish between truth and untruth. He raised the controversial speech Mr. Trump gave at a Boy Scout Jamboree in West Virginia in July 2017, a speech that was overly political and occasionally tasteless. In the face of sharp criticism, the president said that the Scouts' leader had called him to say it was "the greatest speech that was ever made to them."

Of course, no such call ever occurred. But was Mr. Trump actually able to draw a distinction between the past that had really happened and the past that he needed at that moment? Mr. Priess's point was that you could sometimes convince a liar that he was wrong. What do you do with someone who does not distinguish between truth and untruth?

We in the intelligence world have dealt with obstinate and argumentative presidents through the years. But we have never served a president for whom ground truth really doesn't matter. [...]

Intelligence work -- at least as practiced in the Western liberal tradition -- reflects these threatened Enlightenment values: gathering, evaluating and analyzing information, and then disseminating conclusions for use, study or refutation.

The problem--a historical one, not a Donald one--is pretending that only a small group of people should be privy to "intelligence."  Just open source it all and Donald will hear about it on Fox News discussions.



Posted by at April 30, 2018 1:26 PM

  

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