July 16, 2017

THE CULTURE WARS ARE A ROUT:

In 'Spider-Man: Homecoming,' Greatness Starts with Becoming a Servant : Peter Parker has finally entered the Marvel Cinematic Universe--but he can't join the Avengers until he practices the heroic discipline of humility. (JULY 14, 2017, Christianity Today)

Spider-Man made his debut in 2016's hero-packed Captain America: Civil War, in which Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) recruited Peter to join Team Iron Man for a battle against Captain America and a giant-sized Ant-Man. It's easy to imagine that in Peter's eyes, this was like the best and most "spiritual"-feeling summer camp ever. But as Homecoming begins, Tony drops Peter back into his old "unspiritual" life with only a new suit to help with part-time heroics. It's nothing compared to becoming a full-time hero with the Avengers: Spider-Man is stuck in the dull web of home and school, with friends and a pretty girl, but also tests and bullies.

Director Jon Watts's team has fun with Peter's frustration but never laughs at him. Nor does the story cast Iron Man and his amazing friends as villains--even when Tony won't answer Peter's calls. And when Peter jailbreaks his own suit's tech, takes a battle into his hands, and causes a crisis, Tony arrives and steps into a new armored form: Iron Patriarch Mark I.

"I need you to be better," Tony lectures. "I'm taking back the suit."

"I'm nothing without the suit!" Peter pleads.

Tony counters: "If you're nothing without the suit, then you shouldn't have it."

A lesser movie would have taken Peter's side when he demands to be taken seriously and not treated like a kid. But Tony, despite his own immaturity and other flaws, knows this world better. He rightfully lectures and even punishes the well-meaning upstart hero.

In a way, so does the film's villain, Adrian Toomes (Michael Keaton), leader of a band of alien tech scavengers. His arrogant response to a similar authority's correction gives the story its negative example. Toomes also personally challenges Peter's existence--and not just because he can hook into a hovercraft/jetpack and soar high like a vulture, while Peter needs buildings he can stick to. Toomes is aggressive, world-wise, and blue-collar philosophical. In one of my favorite Marvel villain scenes, he challenges Peter: Why can't Peter see that Toomes is only doing what's right to protect his people? After all, those rich heroes like Tony don't know how the real world works. They only care for themselves.

Peter's humble, intentional response, both to Tony's well-meant lessons and Toomes's villainous challenges, elevate the film even while it draws us to Peter's side. He's not a Christ-like hero; instead, he's more like us--a Christian-like hero. Like many young Christians, he is given great gifts, cast into a world of established heroes and villains, and burdened to change this world--the same world that keeps interrupting him with jerk schoolmates, barking dogs, Aunt May's probing questions, and school detention.

By the end, Peter finds that he doesn't need to reach a higher numerical score, attain special knowledge, or hit physical training goals to join the Avengers; he simply needs to mature. Through repeated discipline and self-sacrifice, he needs to become a better person. And by defining the goal so vaguely, Tony--and the story itself--incidentally point Peter and his fans in the same direction as biblical servanthood.

Note that the photo accompanying the text depicts the obligatory crucifix scene....


Posted by at July 16, 2017 7:15 AM

  

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