March 20, 2017

IT ALREADY HAPPENED HERE:

WAS NAZI GERMANY MADE IN AMERICA? : A new history argues convincingly that institutionalized racism and common-law pragmatism in the United States inspired Hitler's policies : a review of James Q. Whitman's dedicates his new book Hitler's American Model (David Mikics, March 20, 2017, The Tablet)

Scholars have long known that the American eugenics movement inspired the Nazis; now Whitman adds the influence of America's immigration policy and its laws about race. Today, Whitman's idea that Nazism looked to America for inspiration is liable to throw us into a moral panic. But there's another side to the story, and in the Trump era, especially, we can benefit from taking a hard look at it. Our president was elected in part because he capitalized on an America-first nationalism that hunts ruthlessly for external and internal enemies. In this view, rootless cosmopolitans, immigrants, and the lawless inner cities constantly threaten the real America.

Historians have downplayed the connection between Nazi race law and America because America was mainly interested in denying full citizenship rights to blacks rather than Jews. But Whitman's adroit scholarly detective work has proved that in the mid-'30s Nazi jurists and politicians turned again and again to the way the United States had deprived African-Americans of the right to vote and to marry whites. They were fascinated by the way the United States had turned millions of people into second-class citizens.

Strange as it may seem to us, the Nazis saw America as a beacon for the white race, a Nordic racial empire that had conquered a vast amount of Lebensraum. One German scholar, Wahrhold Drascher, in his book The Supremacy of the White Race (1936), saw the founding of America as a "fateful turning point" in the rise of the Aryans. Without America, Drascher wrote, "a conscious unity of the white race would never have emerged." Rasse and Raum--race and living space--were for Nazis the keywords behind America's triumph in the world, according to historian Detlef Junker. Hitler admired the American commitment to racial purity, praising the anti-Indian campaigns that had "gunned down the millions of Redskins to a few hundred thousand."

In the 1930s the American South and Nazi Germany were the world's most straightforwardly racist regimes, proud of the way they had deprived blacks and Jews, respectively, of their civil rights.
Hitler was not wrong to look to America for innovations in racism. "Early 20th-century America was the global leader in race law," Whitman writes, more so even than South Africa. Spain's New World Empire had pioneered laws tying citizenship to blood, but the United States developed racial legislation far more advanced than that of the Spaniards. For nearly a century African-American slavery was a monumental stain on Jefferson's Declaration of Independence and its claim that "all men are created equal." The Naturalization Act of 1790 stated that "any alien, being a free white person" could become an American--the Nazis noted with approval that this was an unusual case of racial restriction on citizenship. California barred Chinese immigration in the 1870s; the whole country followed suit in 1882.

World War I gave an added impetus to the focus of racialist doctrines on immigration and immigrants. The Asiatic Barred Zone Act of 1917 banned Asian immigrants along with homosexuals, anarchists, and "idiots." And the Quota Law of 1921 favored Northern European immigrants over Italians and Jews, who were mostly barred from immigrating. Hitler praised American immigration restrictions in Mein Kampf: The future German dictator lamented the fact that being born in a country made one a citizen, so that "a Negro who previously lived in the German protectorates and now resides in Germany can thus beget a 'German citizen.' " Hitler added that "there is currently one state in which one can observe at least weak beginnings of a better conception ... the American Union," which "simply excludes the immigration of certain races." America, Hitler concluded, because of its race-based laws, had a more truly völkisch idea of the state than Germany did.

In the area of racial restrictions on marriage, America stood alone as a pioneer. The American idea that racially mixed marriage is a crime had a strong impact on the Nuremberg Laws. In the 1930s nearly 30 American states had anti-miscegenation laws on the books, in some cases barring Asians as well as African-Americans from marrying whites. The Nazis eagerly copied American laws against miscegenation. The Nuremberg Laws, following the American model, outlawed marriages between Jews and non-Jews.

In one respect American race law proved too harsh for the Nazis. In America, the "one drop" rule reigned: Often, you were counted as black if you had as little as one-sixteenth Negro blood. But the Nazi hardliners' proposal to define Germans with one Jewish grandparent as Jews did not get approved at Nuremberg. Instead, quarter- and even half-Jews were treated with relative leniency. Mischlinge, half Jews, could be counted as Aryans, unless they were religiously observant or married to a Jew.

Posted by at March 20, 2017 3:40 PM

  

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