January 26, 2017

NO ONE THINKS DONALD UNDERSTANDS THE CONSTITUTION:

Federalism, the Constitution, and sanctuary cities (Ilya Somin, November 26, 2016, Washington Post)

President-elect Donald Trump has repeatedly promised to engage in large-scale deportation of undocumented immigrants. In order to accomplish that goal, he is likely to need the cooperation of state and local governments, as federal law enforcement personnel are extremely limited. But numerous cities have "sanctuary" policies under which they are committed to refusing cooperation with most federal deportation efforts. They include New York, Los Angeles, Chicago, Seattle, and other cities with large immigrant populations. Sanctuary cities refuse to facilitate deportation both because city leaders believe it to be harmful and unjust, and because local law enforcement officials have concluded that it poisons community relations and undermines efforts to combat violent crime. They also recognize that mass deportation would have severe economic costs.

Under the Constitution, state and local governments have every right to refuse to help enforce federal law. In cases like Printz v. United States (1997) and New York v. United States (1992), the Supreme Court has ruled that the Tenth Amendment forbids federal "commandeering" of state governments to help enforce federal law. Most of the support for this anti-commandeering principle came from conservative justices such as the late Antonin Scalia, who wrote the majority opinion in Printz.

Trump has said that he intends to break the resistance of sanctuary cities by cutting off all of their federal funding. The cities might continue resisting even if they do lose some federal funds. But Trump's threat is not as formidable as it might seem.

Few if any federal grants to state and local governments are conditioned on cooperation with federal deportation efforts. The Supreme Court has long ruled that conditions on federal grants to state and local governments are not enforceable unless they are "unambiguously" stated in the text of the law "so that the States can knowingly decide whether or not to accept those funds." In ambiguous cases, courts must assume that state and local governments are not required to meet the condition in question. In sum, the Trump administration can't cut off any federal grants to sanctuary cities unless it can show that those grants were clearly conditioned on cooperation with federal deportation policies.

Posted by at January 26, 2017 9:17 AM

  

« IT JUST PROTECTS STATE ESTABLISHMENTS OF CHRISTIANITY: | Main | AT LEAST THE SECRETARY HIMSELF HAS EXTENSIVE EXPERIENCE...: »