December 29, 2016

"WHO ARE 'THESE'?":

Democrats Have a Religion Problem : A conversation with Michael Wear, a former Obama White House staffer, about the party's illiteracy on and hostility toward faith (EMMA GREEN, 12/29/16, The Atlantic)

There aren't many people like Michael Wear in today's Democratic Party. The former director of Barack Obama's 2012 faith-outreach efforts is a theologically conservative evangelical Christian. He is opposed to both abortion and same-sex marriage, although he would argue that those are primarily theological positions, and other issues, including poverty and immigration, are also important to his faith.

During his time working for Obama, Wear was often alone in many of his views, he writes in his new book, Reclaiming Hope. He helped with faith-outreach strategies for Obama's 2008 campaign, but was surprised when some state-level officials decided not to pursue this kind of engagement: "Sometimes--as I came to understand the more I worked in politics--a person's reaction to religious ideas is not ideological at all, but personal," he writes.

Several years later, he watched battles over abortion funding and contraception requirements in the Affordable Care Act with chagrin: The administration was unnecessarily antagonistic toward religious conservatives in both of those fights, Wear argues, and it eventually lost, anyway. When Louie Giglio, an evangelical pastor, was pressured to withdraw from giving the 2012 inaugural benediction because of his teachings on homosexuality, Wear almost quit.

Some of his colleagues also didn't understand his work, he writes. He once drafted a faith-outreach fact sheet describing Obama's views on poverty, titling it "Economic Fairness and the Least of These," a reference to a famous teaching from Jesus in the Bible. Another staffer repeatedly deleted "the least of these," commenting, "Is this a typo? It doesn't make any sense to me. Who/what are 'these'?" [...]

Green: You're a little bit of a man in the wilderness. You have worked for the Democratic Party, but you have conservative views on social issues, and you are conservative in terms of theology. There just aren't a lot of people like you. Does it feel lonely?

Wear: It's not as lonely as it might appear on the outside.

One of the things I found at the White House and since I left is this class of people who aren't driving the political decisions right now, and have significant forces against them, but who are not satisfied with the political tribalism that we have right now. I think we're actually in a time of intense political isolation across the board. I've been speaking across the country for the year leading up to the election, and I would be doing these events, and without fail, the last questioner or second-to-last questioner would cry. I've been doing political events for a long time, and I've never seen that kind of raw emotion. And out of that, I came to the conclusion that politics was causing a deep spiritual harm in our country. We've allowed politics to take up emotional space in our lives that it's not meant to take up.

Posted by at December 29, 2016 2:43 PM

  

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