August 15, 2016

FIT, NOT FAT:

The 5 Diseases That Exercise May Ward Off -- If You Get Enough, That Is (Alice G. Walton, 8/15/16, Forbes)

The aim of the meta-analysis, published in the BMJ, was to suss out how disease risk changes with increasing activity, a question hasn't been fully answered. Exercise is generally measured in metabolic equivalents (METs). The 150 minutes of moderate and 75 minutes of vigorous activity correspond to 600 METs/week, for instance, and the WHO recommends getting more than this amount per week. [...]

[P]eople getting the highest amounts of exercise in the study (at least 8,000 METs/week) compared to people with the lowest levels (less than 600 METs/week), had 14% reduced risk for breast cancer, 20% reduced risk for colon cancer, 28% reduced risk for diabetes, 25% reduced risk for heart disease and 26% reduced risk for stroke.

That said, getting these more extreme amounts of exercise wasn't absolutely necessary-there were "diminishing returns" at levels beyond 3,000-4,000 METs/week, which the paper suggests could be an optimal amount. And which suggests that while we may need more than many of us currently get, some serious health benefits are seen at levels that are not totally out of reach for most of us.

Posted by at August 15, 2016 2:06 PM

  

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