July 29, 2015

IT'S NOT AS IF THERE WERE JOBS FOR THEM ANYWAY:

A Dutch city is giving money away to test the "basic income" theory (Maria Sanchez Diez, June 30, 2015, Quartz)

Other countries, including India and Malawi, have tested basic income in the past, but the most famous experiment was one carried out in the Canadian town of Dauphin, in Manitoba. Between 1974 and 1979, The Mincome program gave a stipend to the entire population, varying depending on how much money each person earned.

Evelyn L. Forget, an economist at the University of Manitoba, studied this experiment and wrote a report called "The town with no poverty," published in 2011. Her conclusion? Basic income reduced Dauphin's poverty and alleviated several other problems.

Although working hours dropped, as skeptics had predicted, it happened mainly among young men, who instead continued their education, and mothers who used the financial freedom to focus on childrearing.

"People thought that it was negative, but men were less likely to drop school, which has an influence in lifetime earnings," she told Quartz, "and women took longer maternity leaves."

People who participated in Mincome were less likely to go to hospitals and the town's health facilities saw a drop in mental-health-related complaints, reducing costs, Forget said.

Posted by at July 29, 2015 5:35 PM
  

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