June 18, 2015

THE PROBLEM ARISES...:

Why Bloggers Are Calling It Quits : The Internet can be a rough place for writers. (Amy Julia Becker, 6/12/15, Christianity Today)

Blogging itself--its immediacy, its informality, its conversational tone--is fleeting. There's always an occasion for another update, another issue to comment on.

With such a transient, "what next?" mindset, bloggers and tweeters may experience what media theorist Douglas Rushkoff calls "present shock." In his book of the same name, Rushkoff explains, "Our society has reoriented itself to the present moment. Everything is live, real time, and always-on. It's not a mere speeding up... It's more of a diminishment of anything that isn't happening right now--and the onslaught of everything that supposedly is." Our focus upon the present leads to "narrative collapse," the end of storytelling, the end of understanding our place in the world as something with a beginning, a middle, and an end.

Perhaps writers like Andrew Sullivan--and storytellers like Louis C. K. and Joss Whedon--are responding to the tyranny of the present when they refuse to remain beholden to the constant information cycle of blogging and tweeting and posting photos online. Perhaps they refuse to believe in the inevitability of narrative collapse.


...when the immediate refuses to conform to your narrative. If your narrative is correct the news of the day just confirms it. 

Consider the folks like Mr. Sullivan who wanted to believe the Unicorn Rider was a revolutionary figure. For them, the past 7 years have been bewildering and psychically disturbing.  If you, instead, understood him to be the protypical organizational man, who would go along to get along, then his invariance from prior administrations is not just predictable but endlessly amusing.

Posted by at June 18, 2015 11:26 AM
  

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