March 3, 2015

HOW WE CREATED THE DEFLATIONARY EPOCH:

SIX WAYS THAT THE MINERS' STRIKE CHANGED BRITISH POLITICS FOREVER (FRANK FUREDI, 3 MARCH 2015, Spiked)

The defeat of the Miners' Strike signalled the end of the era of militant trade unions

Of course, there have been industrial disputes since 1985. And some of these have displayed some of the features of traditional trade-union militancy. But the conditions that assisted the flourishing of union militancy in its real sense came to an end as a result of the socioeconomic realities of the 1980s. Trade unions had gained in strength and militancy in the context of the postwar boom. During this period of economic expansion, unions, through industrial action, succeeded in raising living standards for workers. With the end of the boom, however, there came an economic slowdown and a crisis of public expenditure. As unemployment rose, trade unions lost their power and their militant members became marginalised. By the 1990s, the British labour movement's influence had shrunk and its institutions had been sidelined.

The trade unions of today are caricatures of their pre-1985 predecessors. They rarely mobilise or fight. Instead, they prefer to offer a variety of consumer services to their members - insurance, holidays, legal assistance in tribunals, and so on.

One of the key victories in the war on wages.

Posted by at March 3, 2015 3:22 PM
  

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