January 13, 2015

NAZI, NOT FASCIST:

Charlie Hebdo fallout: Specter of fascist past haunts European nationalism (Jacob Heilbrunn January 13, 2015, Reuters)

[T]he more telling event may turn out to be a counter-rally that took place at a 17th-century town hall in Beaucaire, France, that was led by Marine Le Pen, the leader of the far-right National Front. In Beaucaire, the crowd ended Le Pen's rally by singing the French national anthem and chanting, "This is our home."

Le Pen is at the forefront of a European-wide nationalist resurgence -- one that wants to evict from their homelands people they view as Muslim subversives. She and other far-right nationalists are seizing on some legitimate worries about Islamic militancy -- 10,000 soldiers are now deployed in France as a safety measure -- in order to label all Muslims as hostile to traditional European cultural and religious values. Le Pen herself has likened their presence to the Nazi occupation of France.

Journalists surround Marine Le Pen, France's National Front political party head, who reacts to results after the polls closed in the European Parliament elections at the party's headquarters in Nanterre

Le Pen herself espouses an authoritarian program that calls for a moratorium on immigration, a restoration of the death penalty and a "French first" policy on welfare benefits and employment.

They stand with Charlie.

And, just in case you thought the rallies were about free speech, France moves to crack down on terror speech (The Local, 13 Jan 2015)

French courts have started handing out prison sentences to outspoken supporters of the recent terror attacks in Paris, with a girl as young as 15 apprehended by police for referring to the Kouachis as "my brothers".

The longest sentence so far was handed to a man in the northern French city of Valenciennes on Tuesday after he was found guilty of telling police "there should be more Kouachis. I hope you're the next (victims)".

According to France Info, he was sentenced to four years behind bars.

All over France judges are putting France's recently approved Anti-Terror Act to use, a law spearheaded by Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve and geared primarily at stopping terrorists and their sympathizers from condoning barbaric acts and attracting new recruits to their cause on the internet.

Posted by at January 13, 2015 2:19 PM
  

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