December 21, 2014

NOR COULD PANDORA CLOSE THE BOX:

Al-Qaeda 'bursting with pain' over Pakistan school attack (AFP, 12/21/14)

Al-Qaeda's regional branch on Sunday said its hearts were "bursting with pain" over the Taliban's massacre at a Pakistan school and urged the militants to target only security forces.

The attack on Tuesday killed 149 people -- mostly children -- in the northwestern Pakistani city of Peshawar.

"Our hearts are bursting with pain and grief over this incident," Osama Mehmood, spokesman for Al-Qaeda South Asia chapter said in a four-page emailed statement.



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Muslims and Islam Were Part of Twin Towers' Life (SAMUEL G. FREEDMAN, September 10, 2010, NY Times)

Sometime in 1999, a construction electrician received a new work assignment from his union. The man, Sinclair Hejazi Abdus-Salaam, was told to report to 2 World Trade Center, the southern of the twin towers.

In the union locker room on the 51st floor, Mr. Abdus-Salaam went through a construction worker's version of due diligence. In the case of an emergency in the building, he asked his foreman and crew, where was he supposed to reassemble? The answer was the corner of Broadway and Vesey.

Over the next few days, noticing some fellow Muslims on the job, Mr. Abdus-Salaam voiced an equally essential question: "So where do you pray at?" And so he learned about the Muslim prayer room on the 17th floor of the south tower.

He went there regularly in the months to come, first doing the ablution known as wudu in a washroom fitted for cleansing hands, face and feet, and then facing toward Mecca to intone the salat prayer.

On any given day, Mr. Abdus-Salaam's companions in the prayer room might include financial analysts, carpenters, receptionists, secretaries and ironworkers. There were American natives, immigrants who had earned citizenship, visitors conducting international business -- the whole Muslim spectrum of nationality and race. [...]

"We weren't aliens," Mr. Abdus-Salaam, 60, said in a telephone interview from Florida, where he moved in retirement. "We had a foothold there. You'd walk into the elevator in the morning and say, 'Salaam aleikum,' to one construction worker and five more guys in suits would answer, 'Aleikum salaam.' "

One of those men in suits could have been Zafar Sareshwala, a financial executive for the Parsoli Corporation, who went to the prayer room while on business trips from his London office. He was introduced to it, he recently recalled, by a Manhattan investment banker who happened to be Jewish.

"It was so freeing and so calm," Mr. Sareshwala, 47, said in a phone conversation from Mumbai, where he is now based. "It had the feel of a real mosque. And the best part is that you are in the epicenter of capitalism -- New York City, the World Trade Center -- and you had this island of spiritualism. I don't think you could have that combination anywhere in the world."

How, when and by whom the prayer room was begun remains unclear. Interviews this week with historians and building executives of the trade center came up empty. Many of the Port Authority's leasing records were destroyed in the towers' collapse. The imams of several Manhattan mosques whose members sometimes went to the prayer room knew nothing of its origins.

Yet the room's existence is etched in the memories of participants like Mr. Abdus-Salaam and Mr. Sareshwala. Prof. John L. Esposito of Georgetown University, an expert in Islamic studies, briefly mentions the prayer room in his recent book "The Future of Islam."

Moreover, the prayer room was not the only example of Muslim religious practice in or near the trade center. About three dozen Muslim staff members of Windows on the World, the restaurant atop the north tower, used a stairwell between the 106th and 107th floors for their daily prayers.

Without enough time to walk to the closest mosque -- Masjid Manhattan on Warren Street, about four blocks away -- the waiters, chefs, banquet managers and others would lay a tablecloth atop the concrete landing in the stairwell and flatten cardboard boxes from food deliveries to serve as prayer mats.

During Ramadan, the Muslim employees brought their favorite foods from home, and at the end of the daylight fast shared their iftar meal in the restaurant's employee cafeteria.

"Iftar was my best memory," said Sekou Siby, 45, a chef originally from the Ivory Coast. "It was really special."

Posted by at December 21, 2014 10:58 AM
  

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