September 23, 2014

IN FACT, WE OUGHT TO BE SEEKING TO MOVE MORE FOLKS TOO THEM:

WHY SUBURBIA IRKS SOME CONSERVATIVES (Joel Kotkin, 09/22/2014, New Geography)

Less well-noticed is that opposition to suburbs - usually characterized as "sprawl" - has been spreading to the conservative movement. Old-style Tories like author-philosopher Roger Scruton do not conceal their detestation of suburbia and favor, instead, European-style planning laws that force people to live "side by side." Densely packed Paris and London, he points out, are clearly better places to visit for well-heeled tourists than Atlanta, Houston or Dallas.

There may be more than a bit of class prejudice at work here. British Tories long havedisliked suburbs and their denizens. In a 1905 book, "The Suburbans," the poet T.W.H. Crossland launched a vitriolic attack on the "low and inferior species," the "soulless" class of "clerks" who were spreading into the new, comfortable houses in the suburbs, mucking up the aesthetics of the British countryside.

Not surprisingly, many British conservatives, like Scruton, and his American counterparts frequently live in bucolic settings, and understandably want these crass suburbanites and their homes as far away as possible. Yet, there is precious little concern that - in their zeal to protect their property - they have also embraced policies that have engendered huge housing inflation, in places like greater London or the San Francisco Bay Area, that is among the most extreme in the high-income world.

Of course, the conservative critique of suburbia does not rest only on aesthetic disdain for suburbs, but is usually linked to stated social and environmental concerns. "There's no telling how many marriages were broken up over the stress of suburb-to-city commutes," opines conservative author Matt Lewis in a recent article in The Week. In his mind, suburbs are not only aesthetically displeasing but also anti-family.

What seems clear is that Lewis, and other new retro-urbanist conservatives, are simply parroting the basic urban legends of the smart-growth crowd and planners. If he actually researched the issue, he would learn that the average commutes of suburbanites tend to be shorter, according to an analysis of census data by demographer Wendell Cox, than those in denser, transit-oriented cities. The worst commuting times in America, it turns out, to be in places such as Queens and Staten Island, both located in New York City.

Other conservatives also point to the alleged antisocial aspect of conservatism, a favored theme of new urbanists everywhere. A report co-written by the late conservative activist Paul Weyrich supported forcing "traditional designs for the places we live, work and shop," which "will encourage traditional culture and morals," such as community and family.

Once again, however, a serious examination of research - as opposed to recitation of planners' cant - shows that suburbanites, as University of California researchers found, tend to be more engaged with their neighbors than are people closer to the urban core. Similarly, a 2009 Pew study recently found that, among the various geographies in America, residents in suburbia were more "satisfied" than were either rural or urban residents.

In working against suburbia, these conservatives are waging a war on middle-class America, not necessarily a smart political gambit. 

Besides the eventual immigration amnesty, which will fuel Latino home purchases in suburbia, conserrvatives should be working to completely voucherize public housing policy, which would depopulate the cities in favor of suburbia.

Posted by at September 23, 2014 5:04 PM
  

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