June 16, 2014

WE DON'T HAVE A JOBS CRISIS; WE HAVE A REDISTRIBUTION QUESTION:

Conservative Redistribution? (Peter Augustine Lawler, June 14, 2014, National Review)

[I]t no longer seems as clear as it once did that lower taxes and fewer regulations for "job creators" is actually most of the recipe for improving most American lives.  We see too many increases in productivity that don't have a corresponding increase in jobs.  Sometimes, in fact, the key to efficiency and productivity, as it is  at Amazon, is replacing people with robotics.  And there are some libertarians who actually believe that the key to making higher education better is replacing professors with machines.

I've mentioned often, in fact, the candid prediction of Tyler Cowen that the future is endlessly bright for members of the cognitive elite highly comfortable with working with genius machines (and marketing the productions of said machines), but most people will become, at best, marginally productive-often intellectually, relationally, and materially worse off than they are now.  Becoming more attentive to the middle class means really thinking about the ambiguous effects of the 21st century global marketplace on the lives of ordinary American persons-who aren't only productive individuals but parents, children, creatures, friends, and citizens.
Posted by at June 16, 2014 2:48 PM
  
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