May 31, 2013

RE-EXTENDING THE FAMILY WILL FIX THAT:

The Lethality of Loneliness : We now know how it can ravage our body and brain (JUDITH SHULEVITZ, 5/16/13, New Republic)

Just as we once knew that infectious diseases killed, but didn't know that germs spread them, we've known intuitively that loneliness hastens death, but haven't been able to explain how. Psychobiologists can now show that loneliness sends misleading hormonal signals, rejiggers the molecules on genes that govern behavior, and wrenches a slew of other systems out of whack. They have proved that long-lasting loneliness not only makes you sick; it can kill you. Emotional isolation is ranked as high a risk factor for mortality as smoking. A partial list of the physical diseases thought to be caused or exacerbated by loneliness would include Alzheimer's, obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, neurodegenerative diseases, and even cancer--tumors can metastasize faster in lonely people.

The psychological definition of loneliness hasn't changed much since Fromm-Reichmann laid it out. "Real loneliness," as she called it, is not what the philosopher Søren Kierkegaard characterized as the "shut-upness" and solitariness of the civilized. Nor is "real loneliness" the happy solitude of the productive artist or the passing irritation of being cooped up with the flu while all your friends go off on some adventure. It's not being dissatisfied with your companion of the moment--your friend or lover or even spouse-- unless you chronically find yourself in that situation, in which case you may in fact be a lonely person. Fromm-Reichmann even distinguished "real loneliness" from mourning, since the well-adjusted eventually get over that, and from depression, which may be a symptom of loneliness but is rarely the cause. Loneliness, she said--and this will surprise no one--is the want of intimacy.

Today's psychologists accept Fromm-Reichmann's inventory of all the things that loneliness isn't and add a wrinkle she would surely have approved of. They insist that loneliness must be seen as an interior, subjective experience, not an external, objective condition. Loneliness "is not synonymous with being alone, nor does being with others guarantee protection from feelings of loneliness," writes John Cacioppo, the leading psychologist on the subject. Cacioppo privileges the emotion over the social fact because--remarkably--he's sure that it's the feeling that wreaks havoc on the body and brain. Not everyone agrees with him, of course. Another school of thought insists that loneliness is a failure of social networks. The lonely get sicker than the non-lonely, because they don't have people to take care of them; they don't have social support.

To the degree that loneliness has been treated as a matter of public concern in the past, it has generally been seen as a social problem--the product of an excessively conformist culture or of a breakdown in social norms. Nowadays, though, loneliness is a public health crisis. The standard U.S. questionnaire, the UCLA Loneliness Scale, asks 20 questions that run variations on the theme of closeness--"How often do you feel close to people?" and so on. As many as 30 percent of Americans don't feel close to people at a given time.

Loneliness varies with age and poses a particular threat to the very old, quickening the rate at which their faculties decline and cutting their lives shorter. But even among the not-so-old, loneliness is pervasive. In a survey published by the AARP in 2010, slightly more than one out of three adults 45 and over reported being chronically lonely (meaning they've been lonely for a long time). A decade earlier, only one out of five said that. 

Posted by at May 31, 2013 5:03 PM
  

blog comments powered by Disqus
« WE'LL BE THERE IN A MINUTE: | Main | THUS THE WISDOM...: »