March 2, 2013

A DISORDER, NOT A LIFESTYLE:

G. K. Chesterton: It's Not Gay, and It's Not Marriage (Dale Ahlquist, 2/21/13, Crisis)

Chesterton shows that the problem of homosexuality as an enemy of civilization is quite old. In The Everlasting Man, he describes the nature-worship and "mere mythology" that produced a perversion among the Greeks. "Just as they became unnatural by worshipping nature, so they actually became unmanly by worshipping man." Any young man, he says, "who has the luck to grow up sane and simple" is naturally repulsed by homosexuality because "it is not true to human nature or to common sense." He argues that if we attempt to act indifferent about it, we are fooling ourselves. It is "the illusion of familiarity," when "a perversion become[s] a convention."

In Heretics, Chesterton almost makes a prophecy of the misuse of the word "gay." He writes of "the very powerful and very desolate philosophy of Oscar Wilde. It is the carpe diem religion." Carpe diem means "seize the day," do whatever you want and don't think about the consequences, live only for the moment. "But the carpe diem religion is not the religion of happy people, but of very unhappy people." There is a hopelessness as well as a haplessness to it. When sex is only a momentary pleasure, when it offers nothing beyond itself, it brings no fulfillment. It is literally lifeless. And as Chesterton writes in his book St. Francis of Assisi, the minute sex ceases to be a servant, it becomes a tyrant. This is perhaps the most profound analysis of the problem of homosexuals: they are slaves to sex. They are trying to "pervert the future and unmake the past." They need to be set free.

Sin has consequences. Yet Chesterton always maintains that we must condemn the sin and not the sinner. And no one shows more compassion for the fallen than G.K. Chesterton. Of Oscar Wilde, whom he calls "the Chief of the Decadents," he says that Wilde committed "a monstrous wrong" but also suffered monstrously for it, going to an awful prison, where he was forgotten by all the people who had earlier toasted his cavalier rebelliousness. "His was a complete life, in that awful sense in which your life and mine are incomplete; since we have not yet paid for our sins. In that sense one might call it a perfect life, as one speaks of a perfect equation; it cancels out. On the one hand we have the healthy horror of the evil; on the other the healthy horror of the punishment."

Chesterton referred to Wilde's homosexual behavior as a "highly civilized" sin, something that was a worse affliction among the wealthy and cultured classes. It was a sin that was never a temptation for Chesterton, and he says that it is no great virtue for us never to commit a sin for which we are not tempted. That is another reason we must treat our homosexual brothers and sisters with compassion. We know our own sins and weaknesses well enough. Philo of Alexandria said, "Be kind. Everyone you meet is fighting a terrible battle." But compassion must never compromise with evil. Chesterton points out that balance that our truth must not be pitiless, but neither can our pity be untruthful. Homosexuality is a disorder. It is contrary to order. Homosexual acts are sinful, that is, they are contrary to God's order. They can never be normal. And worse yet, they can never even be even. As Chesterton's great detective Father Brown says:  "Men may keep a sort of level of good, but no man has ever been able to keep on one level of evil. That road goes down and down."

Marriage is between a man and a woman. That is the order. 
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Posted by at March 2, 2013 10:37 PM
  
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