April 20, 2012

WHAT'S THE OPPOSITE OF A PARADOX?

A Small World After All? (Ethan Zuckerman, Spring 2012, Wilson Quarterly)

A central paradox of this connected age is that while it's easier than ever to share information and perspectives from different parts of the world, we may be encountering a narrower picture of the world than we did in less connected days. During the Vietnam War, television reporting from the frontlines involved transporting exposed film from Southeast Asia by air, then developing and editing it in the United States before broadcasting it days later. Now, an unfolding crisis such as the Japanese tsunami or Haitian earthquake can be reported in real time via satellite. Despite these lowered barriers, today's American television news features less than half as many international stories as were broadcast in the 1970s.

Of course, the point is that when it was not a small and interconnected world there was more news, especially international.  In the 1970s people still believed that there were viable alternative forms of politics, economics, spiritual belief, etc.  All international reporting was essentially war reporting.

Today the only stories in the world concern other peoples and nations accepting that the Anglosphere was right all along and that History ended in 1776.  Because globalization is Anglofication there just isn't much "news." any more.  All the dogs are biting and the men never bite back.

Posted by at April 20, 2012 5:49 AM
  

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