January 28, 2012

INFORMATION WANTS TO BE FREE:

Cracking Open the Scientific Process (THOMAS LIN, 1/28/12, NY Times)

The system is hidebound, expensive and elitist, they say. Peer review can take months, journal subscriptions can be prohibitively costly, and a handful of gatekeepers limit the flow of information. It is an ideal system for sharing knowledge, said the quantum physicist Michael Nielsen, only "if you're stuck with 17th-century technology."

Dr. Nielsen and other advocates for "open science" say science can accomplish much more, much faster, in an environment of friction-free collaboration over the Internet. And despite a host of obstacles, including the skepticism of many established scientists, their ideas are gaining traction.

Open-access archives and journals like arXiv and the Public Library of Science (PLoS) have sprung up in recent years. GalaxyZoo, a citizen-science site, has classified millions of objects in space, discovering characteristics that have led to a raft of scientific papers.

On the collaborative blog MathOverflow, mathematicians earn reputation points for contributing to solutions; in another math experiment dubbed the Polymath Project, mathematicians commenting on the Fields medalist Timothy Gower's blog in 2009 found a new proof for a particularly complicated theorem in just six weeks.

And a social networking site called ResearchGate -- where scientists can answer one another's questions, share papers and find collaborators -- is rapidly gaining popularity.


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Posted by at January 28, 2012 6:49 AM
  

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