September 11, 2011

THERE IS NO PAKISTAN:

Why They Get Pakistan Wrong (Mohsin Hamid, 9/11/11, NY Review of Books)

[F]ollowing the terrorist attacks of September 11, linked to members of al-Qaeda living under Taliban protection in Afghanistan, the US returned to the region in force and demanded that Pakistan choose sides. President Pervez Musharraf's subsequent decision to align Pakistan with the US was perceived by many militants as a "betrayal." Still, Musharraf hoped the Pakistani military's conflict with its infuriated, jihadist offspring could be circumscribed, that it might be possible "to drive a wedge between the Pakistani militants and the al-Qaeda foreigners."

This plan, besides denying the extent of the militant threat to Pakistan, was also undermined by US strategy, a strategy that suffered from the outset from what Hussein identifies as two "fundamental flaws." The first of these was a failure to understand that unless Pashtun grievances were addressed--particularly their demand for a fair share of power--the war in Afghanistan would become "a Pashtun war, and that the Pashtuns in Pakistan would become...strongly allied with both al Qaeda and the Taliban."

As the US campaign in Afghanistan began, Hussain writes, Musharraf "warned the United States not to allow the [Northern] Alliance forces to enter Kabul before a broad-based Afghan national government was put in place." But the US ignored this advice, and later, at the Bonn conference of December 2001, Hamid Karzai was installed as chairman (and subsequently president) as Pashtun "window dressing, while the Northern Alliance took over the most powerful sections of the government."

By backing the Northern Alliance against the Taliban and then failing to include a meaningful representation of Pashtuns in a power-sharing deal in Kabul, the US not only sided with India in the Indian-Pakistani proxy war in Afghanistan, it also elevated a coalition of Afghanistan's smaller ethnicities above its largest ethnic group, the Pashtuns. Conflict was inevitable, and since twice as many Pashtuns live in Pakistan as in Afghanistan, it was also inevitable that this conflict would spill over the border.

The results for Pakistan were catastrophic. Over the following decade, as Hussain describes in detail, the Pakistani military's attempts to separate "good" militants from "bad" foundered. Instead, strong networks developed between radical groups in Pakistan's Punjabi east and those in its Pashtun west. With each move of the Pakistani military against them, the frequency and lethality of counterattacks by terrorists inside Pakistan, on both military and civilian targets, intensified. Pakistani casualties soared.

The only way out of this trap, in which an unwinnable "Pashtun war" threatens to swamp an essential Pakistani program to neutralize militants, Hussain suggests, is to address the second "fundamental flaw" in US strategy: the "failure to appreciate that combating the militant threat required something far more than a military campaign," namely a "political settlement with the insurgents, requiring direct talks with the Taliban."


The Pashtun war is easily won, just recognize Pashtunistan.


Posted by at September 11, 2011 6:28 PM
  

blog comments powered by Disqus
« ON A JOURNEY: | Main | WHAT'S MORE NORMAL THAN AMERICA FIGHTING TO LIBERATE OTHER PEOPLES?: »