September 29, 2011

COME BACK, W, ALL IS FORGIVEN:

R2P and the Libya mission: When does 'responsibility to protect' grant countries the right to intervene? (Simon Adams, September 28, 2011, LA Times)

One of the issues privately discussed by foreign ministers at the United Nations was the "responsibility to protect," or R2P. This concept was central to the U.N. mandate to protect civilians in Libya, which led to NATO's aerial involvement there. As the dust settles in Tripoli, it has become necessary to refute a powerful myth that has developed among some pundits and politicians. That myth is that R2P bestows "the right to intervene" in Libya.

Even though R2P features in just two paragraphs of the 40-page "outcome document" of the 2005 U.N. World Summit, historian Martin Gilbert has suggested that it constituted "the most significant adjustment to national sovereignty in 360 years."

R2P's core idea is that all governments have an obligation to protect their citizens from genocide, war crimes, ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity. It is primarily a preventive doctrine. However, R2P also acknowledges that we live in an imperfect world and if a state is "manifestly failing" to meet its responsibilities, the international community is obligated to act. It is not a right to intervene but a responsibility to protect.


But it occurred 220 years earlier.




Posted by at September 29, 2011 7:24 AM
  

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