December 3, 2010

THE POSSIBILITY WOULD SEEM TO EXIST...:

Chicago Cubs legend Santo dies (AP, 12/03/10)

Ron Santo's love for the Chicago Cubs stretched from his days as a standout third baseman who one season even jumped and clicked his heels to celebrate victories to the two decades he spent unabashedly pulling for his team as a broadcaster.

As much as his passion for the Cubbies soothed their long-suffering fans, his play and work in the broadcast booth helped him, too, through tough times and serious ailments, including a bout with diabetes that cost him both legs below the knees. He called the Cubs, simply, his therapy.

Santo, who had finished his 21st season broadcasting the Cubs in September, died Thursday night in Arizona from complications of bladder cancer, according to the team and WGN Radio, his longtime employer. He was 70.


Ron Santo 1940-2010 (Craig Calcaterra, Dec 3, 2010, NBC: HardballTalk)
Ron Santo was one of the most productive and consistent players of the 1960s and early 70s. Because of the low overall offensive profile of the era, however, it might be easy to overlook just how great he really was. His career line was .277/.362/.424. His adjusted OPS, however — which takes era into account — was 125, which places him in similar territory to Yogi Berra, Charlie Gehringer, Kirby Puckett and many other Hall of Fame talents. As is often the case for third basemen, however, Santo’s contributions have been under appreciated. But he was under appreciated even among third basemen. Indeed, in 1964 two third basemen won MVP awards: Brooks Robinson and Ken Boyer. Santo had better seasons than either of them. His value is illustrated by the fact that, for thirty years, the Cubs third base position was defined largely by the fact that they could never get anyone there who could hold a candle him.

Santo was a nine-time All-Star. He hit for power, ranking near the top in home runs all-time among third basemen. He hit for average. He took a ton of walks. He had a nice glove too, winning five Gold Gloves. He was never honored with election to the Hall of Fame, but that’s the Hall of Fame’s fault, not Santo’s. For what it’s worth he has been considered either the best or among the best players not to be elected to the Hall of Fame for many years.


...that he was "punished" for being white and, because voters don't really understand the numbers, electing him would have seemed like tokenism to them.

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Posted by Orrin Judd at December 3, 2010 10:02 PM
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