October 21, 2010

WHY DOES GROVER HATE INCOME AND SAVINGS?:

Who Decides What's 'Beyond the Pale' of the Republican Party? (Peter Wehner, October 20, 2010, Commentary Magazine's Contentions Blog)

In a speech to the Hudson Institute last week, Indiana Governor Mitch Daniels, in accepting the Herman Kahn Award, spoke admiringly of Kahn. Daniels quoted from Kahn's 1982 book, The Coming Boom (it can be found near the 27-minute mark): "It would be most useful to redesign the tax system to discourage consumption and encourage savings and investment. One obvious possibility is a value added tax and a flat income tax, with the only exception being a lower standard deduction." Daniels went on to add: "That might suit our current situation pretty well. It might also fit Bill Simon's line in the late 70s that the nation should have a tax system that looks like someone designed it on purpose."

Governor Daniels's statement was too much for Grover Norquist of Americans for Tax Reform, who said:

This is outside the bounds of acceptable modern Republican thought, and it is only the zone of extremely left-wing Democrats who publicly talk about those things because all Democrats pretending to be moderates wouldn't touch it with a 10-foot pole. Absent some explanation, such as large quantities of crystal meth, this is disqualifying. This is beyond the pale.

Grover has given himself quite a task: defining for the rest of us what is "outside the bounds of acceptable modern Republican thought." What Daniels said is not simply wrong; it is "disqualifying."


Any tent that fits more than one person is too big, eh?

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Posted by Orrin Judd at October 21, 2010 6:06 AM
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