April 25, 2010

WHILE LABOUR REVERTED TO THE SECOND WAY...:

A Lib-Con deal is a real possibility: David Cameron and Nick Clegg could sink their differences more easily than you might think ( Matthew d'Ancona, 4/24/10, Daily Telegraph)

It seems to me that, distilled to their essentials, the polls in aggregate reveal four basic truths about the mood of the British public in late April 2010. First, disgusted by the expenses scandal and the financial crisis, the voters are hungry for change. Second, as a consequence, they no longer want Gordon Brown to be Prime Minister. Third, they lean towards David Cameron PM but have reservations about him, and the prospect of an undilutedly Tory government. Fourth, they have found in Nick Clegg a telegenic tribune, who articulates the nation's grievances better than anyone else and incarnates the dynamism and freshness they yearn for.

From all this, one can pluck a fairly obvious conclusion: that the electorate would be broadly content with a Cameron-Clegg government, but would take to the streets in protest if the outcome of a hung parliament was Gordon Brown's continued occupancy of Number 10 with the terrible connivance of Clegg, the supposed "change-maker". It follows no less logically that all who want to see Gordon removed from Downing Street, and the Tory party in power rather than tearing itself to pieces in opposition, should be thinking constructively about whether and how a Lib-Con pact could work. [...]

It was Clegg who called for "savage" spending cuts in September – a word Messrs Cameron and Osborne would never dare deploy. Long before he was Lib Dem leader, Clegg was advancing plans to break up the NHS far more radical than anything Andrew Lansley, the shadow health secretary, has ever proposed. The Lib Dems have picked up and run with Lord Saatchi's wise plan to remove the poorest from taxation altogether.

Moreover, Clegg and several of his fellow contributors to the 2004 Orange Book have much more in common with the Cameroons than they do with the Brownites: an interest in decentralisation, the strengthening of community and serious public service reform. Broadly speaking, they are part of the same political cohort.


...its rivals moved further Third.

Posted by Orrin Judd at April 25, 2010 8:52 AM
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