January 10, 2010

RECOGNIZING IT AS JUST ANOTHER LITERARY THEORY IS A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION:

The Play's the Thing: a review of On the Origin of Stories: Evolution, Cognition, and Fiction by Brian Boyd (Michael Berube, American Scientist)


Let me explain a thing or two about humanists like me. There are legions of us who reach for our guns when we hear the word genome. That's because we're all too familiar with the history of eugenics, and we flinch whenever someone attempts an "evolutionary" explanation of Why Society Is the Way It Is; we suspect them, with good reason, of trying to justify some outrageous social injustice on the grounds that it's only natural. Likewise, there are legions of us who clap our hands over our ears when we hear the term evolutionary psychology. That's because we're all too familiar with the follies of sociobiology, and we've suffered through lectures claiming that our species is hardwired for middle-aged guys dumping their wives for young secretaries and students (I sat through that lecture myself) or that men run the world because women have wide hips for childbearing, whereas men can rotate three-dimensional shapes in their heads (okay, that one is a mash-up of two different lectures).

Brian Boyd is here to change all that. On the Origin of Stories attempts an evolutionary explanation of the appearance of art -- and, more specifically, of the utility of fiction. From its title (with its obvious echo of Darwin) to its readings of The Odyssey and Horton Hears a Who!, Boyd's book argues that the evolution of the brain (itself a development of some significance to the world) has slowly and fitfully managed to produce a species of primate whose members habitually try to entertain and edify one another by making stuff up.


Just So.

Posted by Orrin Judd at January 10, 2010 8:35 AM
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