October 5, 2008

THAT ONE LEFT A MARK:

Palin's words carry racial tinge (DOUGLASS K. DANIEL, 10/05/08, AP)

By claiming that Democrat Barack Obama is "palling around with terrorists" and doesn't see the U.S. like other Americans, vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin targeted key goals for a faltering campaign.

And though she may have scored a political hit each time, her attack was unsubstantiated and carried a racially tinged subtext that John McCain himself may come to regret.


Uh-huh, if you mention the Unicorn Rider's relationship with 60s terrorists and a black nationalist minister you're the racist.

MORE:
Weathermen: Home-grown US radicals (Joe Boyle, 10/05/08, BBC News)

On 8 October 1969, all that changed. A newly-formed group of left-wing extremists, dubbed the Weathermen, went on the rampage in a well-planned protest in Chicago - the so-called Days of Rage riots.

A police station in the city was bombed, and protesters engaged police in combat on the streets. More than 250 of the rioters were arrested, and the FBI began to follow the movements of the Weathermen very closely. [...]

By the end of 1969 they decided to go underground and resort to bombing strategic targets - later changing their name in the process to the Weather Underground Organization.

From 1970 to 1975 the group bombed police stations, court and government buildings, and police cars.

In 1970 there were fatalities - a police officer died from his injuries after a pipe bomb was detonated in a San Francisco police station, while three of the group blew themselves up while building explosives in their New York apartment. [...]

The group's most audacious attacks came in 1971, when they bombed the US Capitol, and a year later when they attacked the Pentagon.

The group splintered in the mid-1970s and ceased to be regarded as a threat by the authorities.

Many of its members became prominent professionals in US public life.

Bernardine Dohrn, the author of the Declaration of War, is now a law lecturer. Her husband, Bill Ayers, lectures in education.

Both were implicated in the group's most serious attacks, but were never convicted.

During the late 1990s, Mr Obama served on the same charity board as Mr Ayers.


Obama and Ayers Pushed Radicalism On Schools (STANLEY KURTZ, 9/23/08, WSJ)
Despite having authored two autobiographies, Barack Obama has never written about his most important executive experience. From 1995 to 1999, he led an education foundation called the Chicago Annenberg Challenge (CAC), and remained on the board until 2001. The group poured more than $100 million into the hands of community organizers and radical education activists.

The CAC was the brainchild of Bill Ayers, a founder of the Weather Underground in the 1960s. Among other feats, Mr. Ayers and his cohorts bombed the Pentagon, and he has never expressed regret for his actions. Barack Obama's first run for the Illinois State Senate was launched at a 1995 gathering at Mr. Ayers's home.

The Obama campaign has struggled to downplay that association. Last April, Sen. Obama dismissed Mr. Ayers as just "a guy who lives in my neighborhood," and "not somebody who I exchange ideas with on a regular basis." Yet documents in the CAC archives make clear that Mr. Ayers and Mr. Obama were partners in the CAC.

Posted by Orrin Judd at October 5, 2008 1:33 PM
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