July 1, 2006

THE POSSIBILITY EXISTS THAT THE LEFT CAN'T BE TAUGHT THIS LESSON, BUT....:

Blair a failure on crime, say 3 in 4 voters (Patrick Hennessy, Ben Leapman and Andrew Alderson, 02/07/2006, Sunday Telegraph)

Three out of four voters believe Tony Blair has broken his promise to be "tough on crime" in the nine years since Labour came to power, an opinion poll reveals today.

The ICM survey for The Sunday Telegraph also shows overwhelming backing for a top-level independent inquiry - a royal commission - into the failures of the criminal justice system, the key demand of this newspaper's Make Britain Safe campaign.

In another blow for the Prime Minister, who has put the fight against lawlessness at the top of his personal agenda for his remaining time in office, four in five voters are worried about crime levels.


It is not possible, once they embrace the Third Way, for them to be "too far to the Right." They can always afford to go further.


MORE (via Pepys):
The Constant Pardoner (Peter C. Glover, 23 Jun 2006, Tech Central Station)

The minimum five-year sentence for convicted pedophile Craig Sweeney has deepened the public's crisis of confidence in the British criminal justice system -- and stirred the government into pledging a 'sentencing review'. But while the mother of Sweeney's three-year-old victim spoke of wanting to "throttle the judge" who sentenced Sweeney, it is actually the liberalized system itself which may need "throttling". That's the point soon to be made by an explosive new film currently in production entitled Outlaw.

Nick Love's film, starring Sean Bean and Bob Hoskins, is designed to show the devastating consequences of a British justice system soft on criminals. The film focuses on five vigilantes who, "betrayed by their government and let down by the police", take matters into their own hands, meting out summary justice with baseball bats, knives and fists. What Charles Bronson's Death Wish character brought to cheering audiences in the 1970s, Love's Outlaw appears destined to repeat for contemporary audiences.

Posted by Orrin Judd at July 1, 2006 9:08 PM
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