July 19, 2017

THE lEFT IS THE rIGHT:

Planned Parenthood's Century of Brutality : It is functioning today as its eugenics-obsessed founders intended. (Kevin D. Williamson, June 19, 2017, National Review)

Clarence C. Little was a cultivated man. He was a Harvard graduate who served as president of the University of Maine and the University of Michigan. He was one of the nation's leading genetics researchers, with a particular interest in cancer. He was managing director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer, later known (in the interest of verbal economy) as the American Cancer Society; the president of the American Eugenics Society, later known (in the interest of not talking about eugenics) as the Society for Biodemography and Social Biology; and a founding board member of the American Birth Control League, today known (in the interest of euphemism) as Planned Parenthood. His record as a scientist is not exactly unblemished -- he will long be remembered as the man who insisted that "there is no demonstrated causal relationship between smoking or [sic] any disease" -- but he was the very picture of the socially conscious man of science, without whom the National Cancer Institute, among other important bodies, probably would not exist.

He was a humane man with horrifying opinions.

Little is one of the early figures in Planned Parenthood whose public pronouncements, along with those of its charismatic foundress, Margaret Sanger, often are pointed to as evidence of the organization's racist origins. (Students at the University of Michigan are, at the time of this writing, petitioning to have his name stripped from a campus building.) Little believed that birth-control policy should be constructed in such a way as to protect "Yankee stock" -- referred to in Sanger's own work as "unmixed native white parentage," if Little's term is not clear enough -- from being overwhelmed by what was at the time perceived as the dysgenic fecundity of African Americans, Catholic immigrants, and other undesirables. ("The feebleminded are notoriously prolific in reproduction," Sanger reported in Woman and the New Race.) The question of racial differences was an obsession of Little's that went well beyond his interest in eugenics and followed him to the end of his life; one of his later scientific works was "The Possible Relation of Genetics to Differences in Negro-White Mortality Rates from Cancer," published in the 1960s.

The birth-control movement of the Progressive era is where crude racism met its genteel intellectual cousin: Birth Control Review, the in-house journal of Planned Parenthood's predecessor organization, published a review, by the socialist intellectual Havelock Ellis, of Lothrop Stoddard's The Rising Tide of Color against White World Supremacy. Ellis was an important figure in Sanger's intellectual development and wrote the introduction to her Woman and the New Race; Stoddard was a popular birth-control advocate whose intellectual contributions included lending to the Nazi racial theorists the term "untermensch" as well as developing a great deal of their theoretical framework: He fretted about "imperfectly Nordicized Alpines" and such. Like the other eugenics-minded progressives of his time, he saw birth control and immigration as inescapably linked issues.



Pro-Life Advocates Take Justice Ginsburg to Task for Racist Abortion Comments (Steven Ertelt, July 14, 2009, Life News)

"Reproductive choice has to be straightened out. There will never be a woman of means without choice anymore. That just seems to me so obvious," she says.

Reporter Emily Bazelon then asks Ginsburg a question about what she means and Ginsburg responds that the 1980 Harris v. McRae ruling upholding the Hyde amendment, which prohibits federal taxpayer funding of abortions, surprised her.

"Frankly I had thought that at the time Roe was decided, there was concern about population growth and particularly growth in populations that we don't want to have too many of. So that Roe was going to be then set up for Medicaid funding for abortion. Which some people felt would risk coercing women into having abortions when they didn't really want them. But when the court decided McRae, the case came out the other way. And then I realized that my perception of it had been altogether wrong," Ginsburg said.


Posted by at July 19, 2017 9:20 PM

  

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