November 8, 2015

THERE'S NO SUCH THING AS SPECIES:

How did a canine hybrid, 'coywolf,' emerge in front of our eyes? (Lonnie Shekhtman, Staff NOVEMBER 8, 2015, CS Monitor)

The "coywolf" - also known as the coydog, the eastern coyote, the tweed wolf, the brush wolf, the northeastern coyote, or the new wolf - was first described by scientists in the 1960s. Its population has quickly grown to millions and is quickly expanding into the southeast, drawing on the most advantageous features of each of the canid members that make up its hybridized DNA to spread and flourish in areas that have traditionally been inhospitable to purebred coyotes and purebred wolves.

"We've known for a while that most Eastern coyotes are hybrids to some degree, and now we're finding a greater degree of hybridization than anyone expected," Javier Monzón, an evolutionary biologist at Pepperdine University, told The Washington Post last year.

Posted by at November 8, 2015 7:25 PM

  

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