June 23, 2015

NOTHING BUT RACISM:

The surprisingly uncomplicated racist history of the Confederate flag (Marc Ambinder, June 22, 2015, The Week)

In 1948, Strom Thurmond's States' Rights Party adopted the Battle Flag of Northern Virginia as a symbol of defiance against the federal government. What precisely required such defiance? The president's powers to enforce civil rights laws in the South, as represented by the Democratic Party's somewhat progressive platform on civil rights.

Georgia adopted its version of the flag design in 1956 to protest the Supreme Court's ruling against segregated schools, in Brown v. Board of Education.

The flag first flew over the state capitol in South Carolina in 1962, a year after George Wallace raised it over the grounds of the legislature in Alabama, quite specifically to link more aggressive efforts to integrate the South with the trigger of secession 100 years before -- namely, the storming of occupied Fort Sumter by federal troops. Fort Sumter, you might recall, is located at the mouth of Charleston Harbor.

Opposition to civil rights legislation, to integration, to miscegenation, to social equality for black people -- these are the major plot points that make up the flag's recent history.

Posted by at June 23, 2015 7:41 PM
  

blog comments powered by Disqus
« ...AND CHEAPER...: | Main | SUCH DYSFUNCTION DOESN'T MATTER TO A SINGLE-ISSUE CANDIDACY: »