August 22, 2007

CONSTANT HACKERY:

The Problem With Journalism Is Personal (Patrick O'Hannigan, 8/22/2007, American Spectator)

Last Sunday, the [(Raleigh, NC) News & Observer] devoted most of its opinion section to a remix of presentations given by news industry bigwigs to the North Carolina Press Association, which met recently in Charlotte. NCPA convention-goers were hot to find out whether this is the end of news as we know it, and whether public service journalism will survive.

Assuming that it would be impertinent to argue that all journalism is "public service journalism," my answers to those questions are yes and yes, but I am not a professional journalist. The NCPA does not care what I think. More distressingly, the people speculating about the future of journalism in Sunday's pastiche do not appear to have read Randall Hoven, either.

Writing recently for the American Thinker website, Hoven hit on the idea of cataloging known misdeeds for the benefit of anyone wondering why journalists are not as admired now as they were in 1897, when a famous editorial in the New York Sun settled the question of whether Santa Claus exists for an eight-year-old reader who trusted the answer because her father had said, "If you see it in The Sun, it's so."


It's revealing that the example of past press trustworthiness is an obvious lie. The notion that the press was ever trusted or held in much more than conmtempt is just historically inaccurate. Here's a weekend film festival for you that nicely shows what we thought of the media in its supposed heyday:


Posted by Orrin Judd at August 22, 2007 8:24 AM
Comments

Newspeak translation: Public service journalism. 1. Lying by commission; 2. Lying by omission.

Posted by: erp at August 23, 2007 8:48 AM
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