July 10, 2006

LAYER UPON LAYER:

Çatalhöyük excavations unveil very dawn of human civilization (Turkish Daily News, July 10, 2006)

A total of 130 houses have been unearthed to date during excavations at the 9,000-year-old site of Çatalhöyük in Konya's Çumra district, excavation assistant team leader Shahina Farid has said.

The first excavations at the site -- considered one of the oldest settlements in the history of mankind, dating back to the Neolithic Age -- were conducted by British archaeologist James Mellart, who uncovered 80 houses during excavations between 1961-1964, according to the Anatolia news agency.

Work at the site resumed in 1993 after a long hiatus.


Michael Balters' book about the site is fabulous, not least because he structures it like an archaelogical dig..

Posted by Orrin Judd at July 10, 2006 9:47 PM
Comments
The inhabitants of that period buried the dead underneath the house with a sense of being close to their ancestors.

Either that or they discovered a town full of serial killers with a liking for local hobos.

Posted by: Jim in Chicago at July 10, 2006 10:06 PM
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