May 26, 2016

BITTER CLINGING:

If robots are the future of work, where do humans fit in? (Zoe Williams, 24 May 2016, The Guardian)

[A]ll the predictions lead to the same place: the obsolescence of human labour. Even if a robot takeover is some way away, this idea has already become pressing in specific sectors. Driverless cars are forecast to make up 75% of all traffic by 2040, raising the spectre not just of leagues of unemployed drivers, but also of the transformation of all the infrastructure around the job, from training to petrol stations.

There is always a voice in the debate saying, we don't have to surrender to our own innovation: we don't have to automate everything just because we can. Yet history teaches us that we will, and teaches us, furthermore, that resisting invention is its own kind of failure. Fundamentally, if the big idea of a progressive future is to cling on to work for the avoidance of worklessness, we could dream up jobs that were bolder and much more fulfilling than driving.

Marrying, raising kids, community work, etc.  The final triumph of capitalism is how easy it's going to make building social capital.

Posted by at May 26, 2016 5:57 PM

  

« THE PRIVATE PROPERTY PARTY: | Main | WHAT HAS NORTHERN EUROPE TO DO WITH SOUTHERN?: »